Honors Courses

 

Honors Cluster Trip 2014

Honors Sections of University Core Curriculum Courses

Every semester, the Honors College offers Honors sections of several University Core Curriculum (UCC) courses. Honors sections are more intense than traditional sections, they rely more upon discussion, and they are capped at 20 students. Before priority registration begins in the fall and spring semester, the Honors College Office produces a list of all Honors sections of UCC courses and shares it with students via e-mail. The list can also be found on the Honors College webpage.

Honors courses are available by permit only. To request a permit, email Honors at honors@wpunj.edu.

Registration Process: For more information about permits and the registration process click herehere, and here


Spring 2018 – Honors UCC Courses

Courses are available by permit only. Please send an email to honors@wpunj.edu 
to request a permit.

 

UCC 2A

COMM 2630-05 PUBLIC SPEAKING – TR, 9:30-10:45 – Dr. Jen Owlett – CRN # 11648

Students learn the theory and skills of preparing and presenting public speeches. Emphasis is on practice and criticism of classroom speaking experiences.

Credits: 3.0

 

UCC 2C

ENG 1500-11 - Experiences in Literature – TR, 2-3:15 – Dr. Robert Rosen - CRN # 10175

In this course students will explore the ways that poetry, drama, short fiction, film, and non-fiction deal with contemporary social issues.  Substantial writing is required.

Credits: 3.0 

 

ENG 1500-36 - Experiences in Literature – MW 3:30-4:45 – Dr. Marquita Smith – CRN # 10955

This honors section of Experiences in Literature will explore the theme of crime and punishment in American literature. Students will read a range of works across genres, including fiction, memoir, poetry, and film, different historical periods of American culture. Substantial writing is required.

Credits: 3.0

 

UCC 3A

PHIL 1120-02 – Philosophy of the Future – TR 11-12:15 – Dr. Pete Mandik – CRN # 11573

Philosophy focuses on what can be known by reasoning alone concerning topics fundamental to all modes of learning and living. Such topics concern knowledge, free will, the mind, right and wrong, and the existence of God (or lack thereof). We will tackle these topics by applying our own reasoning in discussion of significant philosophical arguments, especially as pertain to the future. Futuristic topics include: the end of the world, the nature of time (and time travel), robots, cloning, and the question of whether we are all in the matrix. We will examine recent relevant research on the philosophy of the future through lectures and discussions based on the assigned readings. 

Credits: 3.0 

 

UCC3C

ECON 2020-07 – Microeconomic Principles – MW 9:30-10:45 – Staff - CRN # 13143

This course discusses the basic economic principles related to the behavior of individual agents. The main topics include the following: 1) Opportunity Cost, 2) Demand and supply analysis, 3) consumer theory, 4) Production and costs, 5) Profit maximization, 6) Market structure (perfect competition, monopoly, monopolistic competition, and oligopoly), 7) Market failure and the distribution of income ad 8) International trade and exchange rates. Prerequisite(s): Fresh Foundation Math 20 or MATH 1060 
Credits: 3.0

 

UCC 4

ANTH 2020-08 - Diversity & Equity in Schools – T 2-4:40 - Dr. Maria Villar - CRN # 11933

Schools are central to the socialization of youngsters and to the formation and maintenance of nation-states. This course critically analyzes the role that schools play in the cultural production of "educated" persons. It examines the links between schools, communities, and the American political-economy in the attempt to explain the disproportionate failure of disadvantaged groups. The course challenges future teachers to think about the effects of history and power on educational processes.

Credits: 3.0 

 

UCC 5

PBHL 3180-02 – Tobacco as a Public Health Issue – MW 11-12:15 – Dr. Marianne Sullivan – CRN # 12963

Tobacco use is one of the most important global public health threats. This course will explore tobacco as a public health issue in the US and globally and evaluate how tobacco control advocates have made progress over the past fifty years with respect to decreasing the public health burden of smoking/tobacco use. There will be a particular focus on community based advocacy, policy approaches and legislative efforts. The course will help students to develop the knowledge and skills necessary to constructively and effectively participate in public health advocacy and policy efforts.

Credits: 3.0

 

UCC WRITING INTENSIVE

FR 3800-60 – Topics in Parisian Culture – T 5-7:40 p.m. - Dr. Madhuri Mukherjee – CRN # 13123

Note that the course will be taught in English.  There are additional travel fees of approximately $1300 due in January.  We expect this course to be designated writing intensive (but it currently isn’t in Banner).

 

In conjunction with a trip to Paris, France, during Spring Break (March 10-17, 2018) this course will explore the effervescent literary and artistic activity that developed around two Montmartre cabarets, the Chat Noir (1881-97) and the Quat’z’Arts (1893-1910), central to the formation of the fin-de-siècle avant-garde aesthetic. The course will examine the major characteristics of this aesthetic, such as humor and parody, and the irreverent absence of seriousness in approaching art. The course will highlight how fin-de-siècle literary-artistic activity, often anonymous or collaborative, subverted the very notions of canon or hierarchy, thus challenging the main tenets of canonized French art, literature and theater, and analyze its role as precursor to important 20th-century movements such as Futurism, Dada, Surrealism and others forms of Performance Art.

Prerequisites: None

Credits:  3.0

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Spring 2018 – Honors Track Courses

Business Track  

Track

Course title

Day

Time

Instructor

MGT/MKT 4020-90

Honors Thesis II

Saturdays

09:30 am-12:10 pm

M. Chao

 

                               

Clinical Psychology and Neuropsychology Track

Track

Course title

Day

Time

Instructors

CLSI 4950-01

Neuropsychology and Cognitive Neuroscience

Monday & Wednesday

09:30 am-10:45 am

B. Diamond

CLSI 4701-01

Clinical Psychology Thesis II

Friday

03:30 pm-05:40 pm

R. Ona

PSY 3990-70

Assessment & Treatment

Tuesday

03:30 pm-05:45 pm

B. Diamond, C. Holle & H. Kollia

 

 

Cognitive Science Track                 

Track

Course title

Day

Time

Instructors

CGSI 3000-01

Selected Topics in Cognitive Science

Friday

12:30 pm-03:15 pm

A. Learmonth

CGSI 4020-01

Cognitive Science Honors Thesis II

Friday

09:30 am-12:15 pm

A. Learmonth/D. Freestone

                               

Humanities Track            

Track

Course title

Day

Time

Instructors

HUMH 2020-60

Humanities Honors Seminar IV

Monday

07:00 pm-09:40 pm

J. Peterman

 

HUMH 3010-60

Humanities Honors Colloquium: The Enlightenment: Origins of Modern Consciousness

Tuesday

03:30 pm-06:10 pm

M. O'Donnell

HUMH 4020-01

Humanities Honors Thesis Seminar II

TBA

TBA

M. O'Donnell

                               

Music Track       

Track

Course title

Day

Time

Instructors

MUSI 4970-01

Music Honors Seminar

TBA

TBA

J. Kresky

MUSI 4980-01

Music Honors Project

TBA

TBA

J. Kresky

               

Nursing Track   

Track

Course title

Day

Time

Instructors

NUR 3500-61

Nursing Research Honors

Thursday

05:30 pm-08:00 pm

L. Foley (not confirmed)

 

NUR 4530-01

Honors Research Seminar

Monday

02:20 pm-03:10 pm

J. Nocella

NUR 3330-01

Research Proposal Development Honors

Monday

12:30 pm-02:10 pm

J. Nocella

 

 

 

Social Sciences Track      

Track

Course title

Day

Time

Instructors

SSH 2010-01

Social Sciences Honors Seminar I

Tuesday

02:00 pm-04:40 pm

N. Kressel