Department of Psychology


The Department of Psychology provides the opportunity for degrees at the BA, MA, and at the PsyD level. The program offers opportunities for students to apply their classroom knowledge to a variety of real-world situations. Hands-on laboratory experiences give students a chance to design and conduct their own experiments. In the psychology major and its associated service offerings, the program strives for currency in the presentation of theoretical approaches, scientific research, and scholarship. Through emphasis on critical thinking and research methods, the Psychology Department seeks to foster a capacity for lifelong learning. By increasing the student's awareness of the human component in various social, industrial, and professional areas, the program serves to instill a responsible orientation to the application of psychological knowledge toward the betterment of the human condition.  

Learn more about each of our programs:

  • BA in Psychology
  • Minor in Psychology
  • MA in Clinical and Counseling Psychology
  • PsyD in Clinical Psychology
BA in Psychology
Individuals with a bachelor's degree in psychology often possess good research and writing skills, are good problem solvers, and have well-developed, higher-level thinking abilities when it comes to analyzing, synthesizing, and evaluating information. Many find jobs in administrative support, public affairs, education, business, sales, service industries, health, the biological sciences, and computer programming. They may also work as employment counselors, correction counselor trainees, interviewers, personnel analysts, probation officers, and writers.

MA in Clinical and Counseling Psychology
Those with a master's degree in psychology often work under the direction of a doctoral psychologist, especially in clinical, counseling, school and testing, and measurement psychology. Some jobs in the industry—for example, in organizational development and survey research—are held by both doctoral- and master's-level graduates. In general, industry and government jobs that focus on compensation, training, data analysis, and general personnel issues are often filled by those with master's degrees in psychology.

PsyD in Clinical Psychology
Individuals with a doctorate in psychology are trained for excellent critical thinking, assessment, analytical, and writing skills. After graduation, clinical psychologists often work at universities, with hospitals or in other human services, outpatient clinics, and primary care offices or community health centers. Additional areas of common employment include government/VA medical center settings, business/nonprofit settings, and independent clinical practices.

Department Spotlight


Psychology major, Michelle LeGrand '16 created "Doodles and Dots," a non-profit art program for fourth through sixth graders in Paterson designed to reduce stress and improve interpersonal and team-building skills. She is now pursuing a dual master's in art therapy and mental health counseling.