Religious and Spiritual Resources

The Office for Student Diversity & Inclusion collaborates with the university community to support the holistic experience of students. William Paterson offers resources to support and promote interfaith engagement and encourage religious persons to deepen their engagement with their own traditions, while developing respect for difference.  

The Prayer & Meditation Room is meant to serve and support all students and the holistic wellness of the university community.  This space allows individuals of all religious faiths and non-religious beliefs to experience a place for peace, prayer, meditation and/or reflection throughout the day.  The space is not intended for any organized programs or meetings.  The prayer and meditation room is available for students to use whenever the Student Center is open.   

The Prayer & Meditation Room is located on the 3rd floor of the Student Center in Room 330.

 Prayer & Meditation Room Guidelines  

To learn more details about Faith-Based groups on campus, check out Pioneer Life: https://wpunj.campuslabs.com/engage/organizations  

  • Catholic Campus Ministry
  • Christian Fellowship (InterVarsity)
  • CRU at William Paterson University
  • Hillel
  • Muslim Student Association

Students can work with the Student Government Association to establish clubs and organizations not listed on Pioneer Life. 

Faith-Based club Advisors work collaboratively with the Office of Student Diversity & Inclusion to coordinate interfaith programs and community resources. 

Rachel Waldorf HIllel headshot

Rachel Waldorf is the Director of Hillel of Northern New Jersey. Hillel of Northern NJ supports Jewish life at five local campuses: William Paterson University, Fairleigh Dickinson University, Bergen Community College, Stevens Institute of Technology and Ramapo College. Rachel is always looking to connect to Jewish students on campus!

Reach out to her if to schedule a coffee meeting or just to find out more information about Jewish life on campus!  You can find her in the Student Center, Room 214 on Tuesdays from 1 p.m. - 3 p.m. 

Contact Rachel Waldorf at Rachel@hillelnnj.org or (908) 839-7158 AND follow Hillel of NNJ on Instagram @HillelNNJ and @WPUHillel. 

Religious & Cultural Holiday Calendar

While not exhaustive, the Religious and Cultural Holiday Calendar  provides an illustration of the various religious and cultural holidays celebrated by members of our community.   Those holidays bolded signify a holiday on which work is prohibited, there is a fast, or daily life is impacted in some way.  

2022 Days Holiday Religion

July 7 - July 8

Begins at sundown

Day of Hajj
Day of Hajj / Day at Arafat commemorates the last revelation of the Prophet at Mount Arafat shortly before his death. Muslims on Hajj attend a service on the plains in front of Mount Arafat. (Observance begins at sunset of July 7, but special worship and prayers begin on July 8). Description provided by Multifaith Calendar.

Muslim
July 8 - July 9 Begins at sundown

Eid al Adha
Eid al Adha (the Festival of Sacrifice) is the concluding act of pilgrimage and is observed even when not on pilgrimage. As Abraham offered his son, Ishmael, to God, Muslims offer sheep, goats and camels. They distribute the meat to the poor. (Observance begins at sunset of July 19, but special worship and prayers begin on July 20). Description provided by Multifaith Calendar.

Muslim
July 10 All Day

Martyrdom of The Bab
The martyrdom of The Bab memorializes His death. Baha'is suspend work on this day. Description provided by Multifaith Calendar.

Baha'i

July 13

All Day

Asalha Puja Day
Asalha Puja (Dhamma Day) commemorates the Buddha's first discourse, given to the five monks at the Deer Park at Sarnath, near Varanasi. The day is observed by donating offerings to temples and listening to sermons (Theravada). Description provided by Multifaith Calendar.

Buddhist

July 29 - 30

Begins at sundown

Muharram (New Year)
The first of Muharram (first month of the Islamic year 1443) celebrates the Hijra (migration) of Muharram and his followers in 622 CE, from Mecca to Medina, where they established the first Islamic community. Observance begins at sunset of July 29, but special worship and prayers begin on July 30. Description provided by Multifaith Calendar.

Muslim
Aug. 1 All Day

Lammas/Lughnsadh
Lammas, also called Lughnsadh, is the celebration of the grain harvest, the Harvest of First Fruits. Many traditions celebrate Lammas as the funeral of Lugh, the sun God whose strength is visibly waning by late summer. Religious accommodation for special worship may be required for this observance/holy day. Description provided by Multifaith Calendar.

Wiccan
Aug. 6 - 7 Begins at sundown

Tish'a B'Av
Tish'a B'Av, or the Ninth of the month of Av, is a major fast day commemorating the destruction of the First and Second Temples in Jerusalem in ancient times. Description provided by Multifaith Calendar.

Jewish

Aug. 7 - 8

Begins at sundown

Ashura
For Shi’ite Muslims Ashura commemorates the martyrdom of Ḥusain, Prophet Muḥammad’s grandson, in AH 61 (680 CE). They observe the event for 10 days, from the first of the month (Ashura means the 10th). It is a time of great mourning. For Sunni Muslims, Ashura is a time to remember two of Allāh’s merciful acts: Noah’s safe landing after the Flood and the Israelites liberation from Egypt under Moses. Since Muḥammad fasted on this day, fasting is recommended but not required. (Observance begins at sunset of the previous day, but special worship and prayers begin August 8.) Description provided by Multifaith Calendar.

Muslim

Aug. 15

All Day

Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary
Roman Catholic Christian observance commemorating the belief that the Blessed Virgin Mary was assumed body and soul into heaven a the end of her earthly life. It is Holy Day of Obligation. Description provided by Multifaith Calendar.

Christian
Aug. 18 All Day

Nowruz
Nowruz is the start of the New Year for Zoroastrians who follow the Shenshai Calendar, and the beginning of the year 1392 AY. (After Yazdegird III, the last of the Zoroastrian kings of Persia.) Description provided by Multifaith Calendar.

Zarathushti
Aug. 19 - 20 All Day

Sri Krishna Janmashtami
This two-day festival celebrates the birth of Krishna, a widely-worshiped Hindu God. Krishna is considered to be a warrior, hero, teacher, and philosopher. General practices: During this festival, Hindus are likely to forgo sleep in order to sing bhajans, traditional Hindu songs. Many Hindus also fast during the first day of the festival. Dances, songs, and plays depicting the life of Krishna are common. Description provided by University of Missouri's Inclusion, Diversity & Equity Division.

Hindu
Aug. 24 All Day

Birth of Prophet Zarathustra
The birth anniversary of the Prophet Zarathustra (Zoroaster), who was born at the beginning of the first millennium BCE. It is one of the most important Zoroastrian festivals. Known as Khordad Sal, Zarathushtis gather in Fire temples for prayers and then celebrate with festing. (Shenshai calendar) Description provided by Multifaith Calendar.

Zarathushti
Aug. 25 - Sept. 5 All Day

Paryushana-parva
Paryushana-parva is the holiest period of the year for the ascetic Shvetambara sect. Celebrated for eight days concluding on Samvatsari, it is a time fo dedication to Jain ideals through fasting, worship of the Jina, and reading the life-story of Lord Mahavira from the Kalpasutra. The degree of fasting and period of fasting depends on the individual, but it is considered obligatory to fast on the last day of Paryushana. Description by Multifaith Calendar.

Jain

Aug. 31

All Day

Ganesh Chaturthi
Ganesh Chaturthi celebrates the birth date of Ganesh, God of Success. Description provided by Multifaith Calendar.

Hindu

Sept. 25 - 27

Begins at sundown

Rosh Hashanah
New Year's Day, year 5783, and anniversary of the creation of the world. The first of the Ten Days of Awe (or Repentance). Religious accommodation may be required for this observance/holy day. Suspension of work/classes may be requested by those observing. Description provided by Multifaith Calendar.

Jewish

Sept. 26 - Oct. 4

 

Navaratri
Navaratri is a nine night festival that honors the Mother Goddess in all her manifestations, including Durga, Lakshmi and Saraswati. It is a festival characterized by worship and dance. The festival culminates with Dussehra, the victory of good over evil, on the tenth day. Description provided by Multifaith Calendar.

Hindu

Oct. 4 - 5

Begins at sundown

Yom Kippur
(Day of Atonement) is the year's holiest day and a day of fasting. To re-establish oneness with God, Jews ask forgiveness and forgive others. Then can they confess their sins and ask God's forgiveness. Religious accommodation may be required for this observance/holy day. Suspension of work/classes may be requested by those observing. Description provided by Multifaith Calendar.

Jewish

Oct. 9 - 10

Begins at sundown

Mawlid al-Nabi
Mawlid al-Nabi is the anniversary of the birth of Prophet Muḥammad. Some Muslims mark this occasion by fasting or with parades, special prayers or conferences. Other Muslims may mark the occasion by dedicating more time to read the Qur‘an. (Special worship, including prayers, fasting and other observances begin at sunset and are generally observed until sunset of the following day.) Description provided by Multifaith Calendar.

Muslim

Oct. 9 - 16

Begins at sundown

Sukkot
A pilgrimage feast and a time of thanksgiving, it celebrates God’s presence in creation and among the Jewish people. Religious accommodation may be required for this observance/holy day. Suspension of work/classes may be requested by those observing. Description provided by Multifaith Calendar.

Jewish

Oct. 16 - 17

Begins at sundown

Shmini Atzeret
Shmini Atzeret (the Eighth Day of Assembly) is a separate holiday concluding Sukkot and the entire fall holiday season. It marks the beginning of winter in the land of Israel. Religious accommodation may be required for this observance/holy day. Suspension of work/classes may be requested by those observing. Description provided by Multifaith Calendar.

Jewish

Oct. 17 - 18

Begins at sundown

Simhat Torah
Simḥat Torah (Rejoicing of the Law) is the beginning of the synagogue's annual Torah reading cycle. Reform Jews celebrate it along with Shemini Atzeret. Religious accommodation may be required for this observance/holy day. Suspension of work/classes may be requested by those observing. Description provided by Multifaith Calendar.

Jewish

Oct. 24

All Day

Diwali
A very popular festival known as the Festival of Lights, Diwali (Deepavali) is dedicated to the Goddesses Kali in Bengal and Lakshmi (the Goddess of Wealth) in the rest of India. Diwali is associated with a story about the destruction of evil by Lord Vishnu in one of his many manifestations. Religious accommodation for special worship may be required for this observance/holy day. Description provided by Multifaith Calendar.

Hindu, Jain, Sikh

Oct. 26

All Day

Birth of the Bab
The birth anniversary of The Bab (Herald of the new age for Baha'is). His shrine is at the Baha’i World Centre, Haifa, Israel. Religious accommodation may be required for this observance/holy day. Suspension of work/classes may be requested by those observing. Description provided by Multifaith Calendar.

Baha’i

Oct. 26

All Day

Birth of the Baha’u’llah
The anniversary of the birth of Bahá'u'lláh, the founder of the Bahá'i faith. Bahá'ís suspend work on this day. Religious accommodation may be required for this observance/holy day. Suspension of work/classes may be requested by those observing. Description provided by Multifaith Calendar.

Baha’i

Oct. 31

All Day

Samhain
This day celebrates the Celtic New Year. The dying God returns to the womb of the Goddess in preparation for rebirth at Yule. The souls of those who have died during the turning of the past year's wheel are bid farewell. It also marks the third and final harvest. Vegan Wiccans harvest nuts, the kernels of which are symbols of wisdom. As the veil between the physical and spiritual worlds is thinnest at this time, ancestors can join the celebrations. Religious accommodation for special worship may be required for this observance/holy day. Description provided by Multifaith Calendar.

Wiccan

Nov. 1

All Day

All Saints' Day
All Saints' Day is a day to honor Christian saints throughout the ages. Description provided by Multifaith Calendar.

Christian
Nov. 24 All Day

Martyrdom of Guru Tegh Bahadur Ji
This day commemorates the martyrdom of Guru Tegh Bahadur Ji (1621-1675), the ninth of the Ten Sikh Gurus. He is remembered not only for his defense of the Sikh faith, but also for willingly giving up his life for religious liberty for all faiths. Description provided by Multifaith Calendar.

Sikh

Nov. 8

All Day

Birth of Guru Nanak Dev Ji
Founder of the Sikh faith and first of the Ten Gurus, Guru Nanak Dev Ji was born in 1469 CE. He was an accomplished poet; 974 of his hymns are contained in the Sikh Scriptures, the Sri Guru Granth Sahib Ji. Religious accommodation for special worship may be required for this observance/holy day. Description provided by Multifaith Calendar.

Sikh

Nov. 24

All Day

Martyrdom of Guru Tegh Bahadur Ji
This day commemorates the martyrdom of Guru Tegh Bahadur Ji (1621-1675), the ninth of the Ten Sikh Gurus. He is remembered not only for his defence of the Sikh Faith, but also for willingly giving up his life for religious liberty for all faiths. Religious accommodation for special worship may be required for this observance/holy day. Description provided by Multifaith Calendar.

Sikh

Nov. 26

All Day

Day of the Covenant
This day celebrates the anniversary of the appointment of 'Abdul-Bahá, the son of Bahá'u'lláh, as the Centre of the Covenant. Description provided by Multifaith Calendar.

Baha’i

Dec. 8

All Day

Bodhi Day
Celebration of Buddha’s attainment of enlightenment. Description provided by Yale University Chaplain's Office.

Buddhist

Dec. 18 - 26

Begins at sundown

Hanukkah
Ḥanukkah, the Festival of Lights (and the Feast of Dedication), commemorates the victory of Judah the Maccabee and religious freedom, and the re-dedication of the Temple in 165 BCE. It also celebrates the power of God and the faithfulness of Israel. Description provided by Multifaith Calendar.

Jewish

Dec. 21

All Day

Yule
This day, which marks the New Year in the Anglo-Saxon and northern traditions of Wicca, is the celebration of the birth of the God as the Winter-born King, symbolized by the rebirth of the life-generating and life-sustaining sun. It is a time for ritually shedding the impurities of the past year, and for contemplating avenues of spiritual development in the year ahead. Description provided by Multifaith Calendar.

Wiccan
Dec. 24 - 25 Begins at sundown

Christmas/Feast of the Nativity
Christmas is the annual celebration commemorating the birth of Jesus of Nazareth, the Messiah whose message and self-sacrifice began the Christian religion. Begins at sundown on Dec. 24 annually and continues with all day celebration on Dec. 25. Description provided by University of Missouri's Inclusion, Diversity & Equity Division.

Christian

Dec. 26 - Jan. 1

All Day

Kwanzaa
Kwanzaa is celebrated by many North Americans of West African descent in recognition of their African heritage. The candles of a seven-branched candelabrum representing attributes such as unity, self-determination, responsibility, cooperative economics, purpose, creativity and faith, are successively lit over the seven days of the festival. Description provided by University of Missouri's Inclusion, Diversity & Equity Division.

African-American/Pan-African
2023 Days Holiday Religion
Jan. 1 All Day

Gantan-Sai

On Gantan-sai, Japanese welcome in the New Year with prayers for renewal of hearts, good health, and prosperity. They wear their best clothes and visit shrines in large numbers, sometimes at the stroke of midnight on New Year's Eve. During the seven days of the holiday, people visit one another's homes to offer good wishes for the coming year. Description provided by the Multifaith Calendar.

Shinto
Jan.5 All Day

Birthday of Guru Gobindh Singh

The tenth Sikh Guru, he created the Khalsa, the Fellowship of the Pure, and as his successor he declared the Scriptures, the Sri Guru Granth Sahib Ji, to be the Sikh's Guru from that time on. Description provided by the Multifaith Calendar.

Sikh
Jan. 7 All Day

Christmas/Feast of the Nativity
Christmas celebrates the anniversary of the birth of Jesus. Description provided by Multifaith Calendar.

 Christian
Jan. 14 All Day

Makar Sankranti

This harvest festival marks the change from a decrease to an increase of the sun. This observance is twinned with Lohri (celebrated by people from the Punjab region of South Asia), which also marks the passing of the winter solstice. Description provided by Multifaith Calendar.

Hindu
Jan. 22 All Day

Lunar New Year

Chinese/Vietnamese/Korean New Year (4721): Year of the Rabbit. The first day after the new (dark) moon is a religious and cultural festival celebrated by Chinese, Vietnamese and Koreans of Buddhist and other backgrounds as New Year’s Day. Tibetans may celebrate on a different date. Description provided by Multifaith Calendar.

Buddhist
Feb. 2 Begins at sundown

Imbolc/Candlemas

Also referred to as the Feast of Pan, Feast of Torches, Feast of Waxing Lights and Oimele. Celebrates the coming of spring and recovery of the Earth Goddess after giving birth to the Sun God at Yule. For many traditions, a time for initiations, re-dedication and pledges for the coming year. One of the four "greater Sabbats." Description provided by University of Missouri Office of Inclusion, Diversity & Equity.

Wiccan/Pagan
Feb. 18 All Day Maha Shivaratri
An evening celebration of the wedding of Lord Shiva and his consort Goddess Parvati. Description provided by Yale University Chaplain's Office.
Hindu
Feb. 22 All Day

Ash Wednesday 

Ash Wednesday marks the beginning of the season of Lent in the Western Christian churches, the 40-day period of prayer, fasting, and repentance prepares Christians for Holy Week and Easter. Some Christians will receive a cross of ash on their foreheads at Ash Wednesday worship, signifying their mortality. The ashes are made by burning the palms used in the previous year's observance of Palm Sunday. Description provided by Yale University Chaplain's Office.

Christian

Feb. 27

All Day

Great Fast

The Great Fast is the start of the "Great Lent" for Orthodox Christians. This day, also called Clean Monday, occurs seven weeks before Orthodox Easter. Description provided by Multifaith Calendar.

 Christian

March 2

Sunrise to sunset

Ala

Ala (Loftiness), nineteenth & final month of the Baha'i year, is the time of the 19-day fast (until March 20th) in preparation for Naw-Ruz. Those who are healthy and of age (15-70 years) abstain from food and drink from sunrise to sunset. Description provided by Multifaith Calendar.

Baha'i
March 6 Begins at sundown

Purim
Purim celebrates victory over an oppressive ruler, as related in the Book of Esther, which is read at this time. Description by Multifaith Calendar.

Jewish
March 7 All Day

Holi
Holi, a colorful and joyous festival that welcomes Spring, is dedicated to Krishna or Kama (longing). Referred to as the Festival of Colors, it is celebrated over two days with people throwing colorful powder and colored water. Description provided by Multifaith Calendar.

Hindu
March 14 All Day

New Year's Day
Sikh New Year's Day of the Nanakshahi Era. This is the first day of Chet, the first month of the Sikh calendar. Description provided by Multifaith Calendar.

Sikh
March 21 All Day

Naw-Ruz
Naw-Ruz (New Year 175 BE of the Baha'i Era). Baha'is break their fast and celebrate during the evening. The first month of the Baha'i year is Baha (Splendour). Description provided by Multifaith Calendar.

Baha'i
March 22 - April 21 Begins at sundown

Ramadan

Ramadan is the ninth month of the Islamic calendar and is observed by Muslims worldwide as a month of fasting to commemorate the first revelation of the Quran to Prophet Muhammad. This annual observance is regarded as one of the Five Pillars of Islam. Neither food nor drink is allowed from dusk till dawn for the whole duration of the month of Ramadan. Every day of Ramadan starts with the special tradition of preparing for fasting with prayers and a meal, and ends with breaking the fast followed by the special series of evening prayers. The month of Ramadan lasts 29-30 days based on the visual sightings of the crescent moon. Religious accommodations are advised for the first full day of the holiday. (Dates based on lunar observations in North America.) Description provided by Multifaith Calendar.

Muslim

March 30

All Day

Ramanavami
Ramanavami celebrates the birthday of Rama, the seventh incarnation of the God Vishnu. During the previous eight days, Hindus read the Ramayana, a Hindu epic, which tells the story of Rama. Description provided by Multifaith Calendar.

Hindu

April 2

All Day

Palm Sunday
Palm Sunday celebrates the entry of Jesus in Jerusalem. Description provided by Multifaith Calendar.

Christian
April 4 All Day

Mahavira-Jayanti
Mahavira-Jayanti celebrates the birthday of Lord Mahavira (Great Hero), the 24th Tirthankara (and the last of this time cycle). Description provided by Multifaith Calendar.

Jain
April 5 - April 13 Begins at sundown

Pesach/Passover
Pesach/Passover commemorates the liberation of the Jews from slavery in Egypt by Moses. Families and friends remember and retell the story of the exodus during Seders, meals that incorporate symbolic foods like matzoh, bitter herbs, and wine along with songs and unique family traditions. Religious accommodations are advised for the first, second, seventh, and eighth full days of Pesach.  Description provided by Yale University Chaplain's Office.

Jewish
April 6 All Day

Holy (Maundy) Thursday
This religious holiday is not celebrated as a public holiday in the United States. Maundy Thursday services are part of a series of events for many Christians during "Holy Week", the days leading to Easter. Holy Thursday/Great Thursday/Maundy Thursday marks the Last Supper Passover meal that Jesus shared with his disciples. Religious services on Maundy Thursday stress the details of that somber gathering.

Christian
April 6 All Day

Hanuman Jayanti
Hindu celebration of Hanuman who was an embodiment of Lord Rama. Devotion and selfless work are encouraged. Description provided by Multifaith Calendar.

Hindu
April 7 All Day

Good Friday
On this Friday preceding Easter Sunday, Christians and friends throughout the world commemorate the suffering and death by crucifixion of Jesus Christ. Many Christians engage in fasting, acts of charity, silent contemplation, and reflection on Scripture on this day. For Catholic Christians, though this is not a Holy Day of Obligation, it is set apart with strict fasting, abstinence, and attention to fasting, almsgiving, and prayer. Good Friday" is also known as "Holy Friday", "Great Friday", "Black Friday", and "Easter Friday". It is the first day of the Paschal Triduum of Holy Week.

Christian
April 9 All Day

Easter/Pascha
Easter celebrates the resurrection of Jesus. It initiates the fifty-day period culminating in Pentecost.Description provided by Multifaith Calendar.

 Christian
April 14 All Day

Vaisakhi
Vaisakhi (Anniversary of the birth of the Khalsa) is important for Sikhs because on this day in 1699, Guru Gobind Singh Ji, the tenth Guru, removed the clerical system from Sikhism. Thus, he reaffirmed the direct connection between Sikhs and the Divine. Guru Gobind Singh Ji also created the Kahlsa Panth, the Fellowship of the Pure. Khalsa brothers are given the name Singh (Lion), and sisters are named Kaur (Princess or Lioness). Description provided by University of Missouri's Inclusion, Diversity & Equity Division.

Sikh

April 17

Begins at sundown

Yom HaShoah
Yom HaShoah is held in memory of the six million Jews who died as victims of Nazi atrocities (World War II). Description provided by Multifaith Calendar.

Jewish

April 21 - 22

Begins at sundown

Eid al Fitr
Eid al-Fitr, the Breaking of the Fast, celebrates the end of Ramadan, the month of fasting. Observance begins at sunset on April 21, but special worship and prayers begin on April 22. Description provided by Multifaith Calendar.

Muslim

April 21 - May 2

All Day

Festival of Ridvan
The Festival of Ridvan, termed by Baha'u'llah, the "Most Great Festival" and the "King of Festivals", commemorates the twelve days that Baha'u'llah spent in the garden of Ridvan outside Bagdad. The festival commemorates Baha'u'llah's public declaration of His mission to His family and closest followers. The first, the ninth, and the twelfth days of Ridvan are Baha'i Holy Days on which work is suspended. Description provided by Multifaith Calendar.

Baha'i
April 29 All Day

Ninth Day of Ridvan
The Ninth Day of Ridvan is when Baha'u'llah's family joined Him in the garden of Ridvan in Bagdad. Baha'is suspend work on this day. Description provided by Multifaith Calendar.

Baha'i

May 1

All Day

Beltane
Beltane (also called May Day) celebrates the conjoining of the infinite potential of the Goddess with the life-sparking energy of the God in a sacred marriage, the basis of all creation. It is a time for balancing the feminine and masculine tides within the psyche as each celebrant prepares to participate in bringing the creative potential of the year to fruition. Description provided by Multifaith Calendar.

Wiccan/Pagan
May 2 All Day

Twelfth Day of Ridvan
This holiday commemorates the departure of Bahá'u'lláh for Constantinople and brings to a close the Festival of Ridván. Work should be suspended on this holiday. Description provided by www.religionfacts.com.

Baha'i
May 5 All Day

Vesak
Vesak is the most important day of the year for Buddhists. It commemorates the birth, awakening, and passing away (paranibbana) of the historical Buddha, Siddhartha Gautama. (Theravada). May be celebrated on different dates, according to different countries and traditions. Description provided by Multifaith Calendar.

Buddhist
May 23 All Day

Declaration of the Bab
The Declaration of the Bab commemorates the day in 1844 on which He announced His identity as The Bab, or Gate, the Herald of the new age. Baha'is suspend work on this day. Description provided by Multifaith Calendar.

Baha'i
May 25 - 27 Begins at sundown

Shavuot
Shavuot marks the conclusion of the period if seven weeks that follows Pesach. Shavuot commemorates the giving of the Torah to the Israelites and the completion of God's purpose to create a special people. It is celebrated for two days in the diaspora and for one day in Israel and among Reform Jews. Description provided by Multifaith Calendar.

Jewish

May 28

All Day

Pentecost
Pentecost, is the commemoration of the coming of the Holy Spirit upon the disciples of Jesus following his ascension (Acts 2:1-11). It comes fifty days after Easter/Pascha. Description provided by Multifaith Calendar.

Christian

May 28 -29

All Day

Ascension of Baha'u'llah
Ascension of Baha'u'llah marks the anniversary of the death of the founder of he Baha'i faith. It is commemorated at 4:00 am. Baha'is suspend work on this day. Description provided by Multifaith Calendar.

Baha'i

June 27-  July 1

Begins at sundown

Day of Hajj
Day of Hajj / Day at Arafat commemorates the last revelation of the Prophet at Mount Arafat shortly before his death. Muslims on Hajj attend a service on the plains in front of Mount Arafat. Description provided by Multifaith Calendar.

Muslim
June 28 - 29 Begins at sundown

Eid al Adha
Eid al Adha (the Festival of Sacrifice) is the concluding act of pilgrimage and is observed even when not on pilgrimage. As Abraham offered his son, Ishmael, to God, Muslims offer sheep, goats and camels. They distribute the meat to the poor. Description provided by Multifaith Calendar.

Muslim