Welcome!

The Gandhian Forum for Peace & Justice seeks to promote dialog and education on some of the greatest challenges that confront the human race in the 21st century: resolving conflicts, eliminating war, and advancing the cause of social justice. We hope that we can help make this campus a place where such conversations flourish, and a catalyst for encouraging engagement with these concerns in the wider community.

See our mission statement.


Jason D. Williamson

Staff Attorney – Criminal Law Reform Project
American Civil Liberties Union

speaking on

The Police and Communities of Color

Assessing the Realities of Policing in the U.S. and Strategies for Lasting Reform

Thursday, October 16, 2014, 11:00 a.m.-12:15 p.m.
Cheng Library Auditorium, William Paterson University

300 Pompton Road, Wayne, NJ, 07470. [Directions]

Michael Brown, unarmed and shot to death by a police officer in Ferguson, Missouri. Eric Garner died after being put into a chokehold by New York City police officers. The long list goes on, from Anthony Baez to Amadou Diallo to Sean Bell. And then there are the countless cases of police brutality, from Rodney King to Abner Louima. In New York City, since 2002, there have been more than 5 million police stop-and-frisks, overwhelmingly of Black and Latino individuals and nearly 9 out of 10 of them completely innocent. Across the United States, neighborhoods are increasingly being policed by officers armed with the weapons and tactics of war.

What's going on here? And what can we do about it? What strategies can we use for reforming policing in communities of color? We are pleased to have Jason D. Williamson, a staff attorney with the Criminal Law Reform Project of the American Civil Liberties Union, to discuss these issues with us.

Ferguson

Jason Williamson

Prior to joining the ACLU, Williamson served as a litigation associate at the law firm of Paul, Weiss, Rifkind, Wharton & Garrison LLP in New York and began his legal career in New Orleans, first as a staff attorney for the Juvenile Justice Project of Louisiana and later as a defense attorney and founding member of Juvenile Regional Services.

Williamson received his J.D. from New York University School of Law and his Bachelor’s degree from Harvard University.

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Co-sponsored by the Departments of Africana World Studies, Political Science, and Sociology, the Race and Gender Project, the Criminal Justice & Criminology Program, the Legal Studies Program, the Pre-Law Program, the Cotsakos College of Business, the College of Humanities & Social Sciences, and the Office of the Provost


The Gandhian Forum for Peace & Justice
and the WPU Pre-Law Program

present

Jason D. Williamson

speaking on

Careers in Public Interest Law

Thursday, October 16, 2014, 12:30-1:45 pm
Raubinger Hall, Room 1 (enter from side entrance)

For those students interested in law school, public interest law offers an exciting area of practice and a potentially rewarding career path. Is public interest law for you? What are the practice settings of public interest law? What kind of work does one do? What kinds of issues are addressed? What kind of preparation do you need? Can one support oneself with a public interest career? These questions and more will be addressed in this Pre-Law workshop.

Jason Williamson is a Staff Attorney – Criminal Law Reform Project of the American Civil Liberties Union. Prior to joining the ACLU, he served as a litigation associate at the law firm of Paul, Weiss, Rifkind, Wharton & Garrison LLP in New York. He began his legal career in New Orleans, first as a staff attorney for the Juvenile Justice Project of Louisiana and later as a defense attorney and founding member of Juvenile Regional Services. He received his J.D. from New York University School of Law and his Bachelor’s degree from Harvard University.

All Are Welcome! Free Admission

Lunch will be Provided

For more information, please contact Prof. Steve Shalom at 973-720-3433
or Pre-Law Director Prof. Michael Principe at 973-720-3619.
Co-sponsored by the Office of the Provost

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Peace symbolSee our list of resources on Gandhi, nonviolence, peace, and justice, including resources for teachers, academic and research links, and activist organizations.

See our list of WPU courses that substantially address issues of peace and justice.

BooksSee our list of Suggested Readings on peace and justice.