Address to Faculty and Staff Sept 4, 2012

Good afternoon and welcome to the new academic year!  I hope you had a wonderful summer and I’m pleased to see the campus return to full activity today.

This fall, we welcome several new administrators and 37 new faculty members, bringing us to a total of 401 full-time faculty.  As you might remember, last year I introduced 25 new faculty.  This reconfirms our commitment to having full-time tenure-track and tenured faculty as the majority of our professoriate.

Without question, higher education is under attack across the nation.  It’s as if our universities are under a microscope with a wide range of non-experts calling for actions and changes.

We hear cries that colleges are too expensive, they fail to properly educate students, they are badly managed, and the faculties are not committed.  We hear that tuition needs to be regulated and institutions that do not graduate enough students will be subject to elimination of federal student aid or a reduction in state appropriations.  We hear that our system of education is in crisis.

I do not believe our system of education is in crisis, but it is changing.  Can universities do better?  Yes, of course.  Can William Paterson do better?  Yes, of course we can.  At William Paterson, we are not afraid of the demand for more transparency and public accountability and we already have increased information to the public about our activities while adopting a set of goals and metrics by which we will assess our institution going forward.

However, I am afraid of simple-minded definitions of university accountability and success and I am deeply concerned about the criticism directed against the faculty.  Professors are the heart and soul of a university, the source of intellectual stimulation and creativity of the institution.  On our campus, I see faculty inspiring, informing, and invigorating our students in classrooms, labs, studios, practice rooms, and on-line.  I watch how you challenge, support, and, most of all, teach our students, preparing them for the world that awaits them and for a rich emotional and intellectual life.  I read your publications, watch and hear your performances, and exalt in your scholarly accomplishments, national recognitions, and awards for research.  I see and hear the results in the students who leave William Paterson University prepared for their careers and lives.

When we hear students and alumni talk about the campus experiences that most helped them, they refer to the experiences created by the faculty.  Your commitment, creativity, and skills as teachers and scholars provide these experiences.

But we had problems last year in reaching mutual agreement on important issues.  Many people told me last year was one of the most difficult ones in recent history.  People—faculty and staff—felt torn between different agendas as state-wide contract negotiations dragged on for months.  We will have to live with some of those decisions and open-ended questions this year.

Recent changes at Rutgers, UMDNJ, and Rowan will have effects on this state for years to come and we can only speculate about what those changes might mean for William Paterson.  But we need to think about these changes a great deal and plan accordingly.  I sincerely hope that most of the issues from last year are now behind us and that we can amicably work on solutions to any remaining issues.  I hope we can work together to support and build this university.

Some of you have asked where I stand on certain issues and as these issues were under negotiation, I was not in a position to give many public speeches about my academic values and goals.  My values are clear.  I believe in affordable and high-quality public education.  I believe in the tradition of tenure at American institutions and in supporting the intellectual development of our faculty and staff.  I believe in the value of sabbaticals and fully intend to provide sabbatical opportunities at a level and funding that meets national norms.  I also believe in recognizing extraordinary faculty achievement and hope that together we can create a “Distinguished Faculty” title for deserving individuals.  I believe more timely promotion of junior faculty closer to the achievement of tenure is an important goal, and while we made progress in the past two years promoting 57 faculty, we still need to do more.  I believe in increasing the number of tenure-track faculty and in awarding tenure when deserved as opposed to relying ever more heavily on individuals working on a part-time basis.  Again, we have made progress over the past two years and hope to continue to do so.  And I believe actions must follow words.  This year, we will permanently expand the budgets of the five academic deans and the library dean to support our academic programs, an adjustment in some colleges not made in several years.

But we have challenges ahead and a vision and goals to achieve.  Our vision, which we adopted last year, calls for us to be widely recognized as a model of outstanding and affordable public education characterized by rigorous academic preparation and nationally recognized programs that prepare students for personal growth, academic success, and careers.

And we will achieve this vision in the year ahead by achieving our five goals:

Goal 1.  We will offer academic programs of the highest quality.

Goal 2. We will achieve student success by increasing matriculation, retention, and graduation.

Goal 3.  We will provide students with exceptional opportunities beyond the classroom.

Goal 4.  We will enhance the sense of community throughout and beyond the University.

Goal 5.  We will establish the University as a model of outstanding and affordable public higher education.

So what have we done already and what do we need to do this year?

For Goal 1, we created eight new academic degree programs last year.  We need to move more quickly on other pending programs and finish implementing the University Core Curriculum.

For Goal 2, we improved retention and graduation rates, although we have much more to do.  Last year, we reduced the number of credits needed to graduate from 128 to 120 credits. The good news is that an additional 700 students ended up graduating earlier than would have been the case, which we anticipate will yield improved four- and six-year graduation rates.  Other good news is that our freshmen retention rates improved.  We believe this is due in part to providing almost all freshmen with a twelve-month, five-day-a-week service of professional advisors in the Gloria S. Williams Advisement Center, as well as developing a no-tuition summer basic skills program, and expanding student outreach by the First-Year Experience Program.  The not so good news is that the larger number of graduates was not replaced with the same number of new students so that our overall enrollment numbers will dip slightly by about 2 percent.  At the same time, the profile of the incoming freshmen class is more academically prepared than in previous years.  We will continue to improve upon our graduation rates, which are improving but still remain among the lowest in the state.  And we will take new measures to grow enrollments, especially graduate ones that continue to decline statewide.

For Goal 3 we moved forward developing and strengthening new partnerships with businesses, schools, hospitals, and government agencies to provide opportunities for students beyond the classroom.  For example, we have developed key new relationships with Target, Toys R Us, Novartis Pharmaceuticals, Passaic County Superior Court, Atlantic Health Systems, Verizon Wireless, and Panasonic.  Our American Democracy Project will undertake an active program of political engagement leading to the elections this year and we will expand our involvement with the New Jersey Campus Compact.  But we have to move forward with the focused development of international programs this year and more experiential learning.

For Goal 4, we expanded our use of social media both with students and alumni with great success.  Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube are now a daily part of our lives, reaching many more students and alumni than ever before.  Our fall lineup of performing arts is the best in years under the new direction of Jane Stein and we will be pleased to welcome famed journalist Carl Bernstein to campus on October 12 as part of the 33rd Annual Distinguished Lecturer Series.  Be on the lookout for more evening and weekend activities for students and enhanced transfer student programming.  And stop by the newly opened one-stop Center for Student Services in Morrison Hall designed to assist students seeking financial aid, paying bills, or consulting with the registrar.

For Goal 5, keeping it affordable, we raised tuition and fees by only 2.4 percent this year.  This is among the lowest increases in the state and is consistent with our 2 percent increase last year, which was our lowest percentage increase in 30 years.  We have kept residence hall costs the same although meal plans increased with rising food costs.  For the coming year we are reviewing student financial aid, we have more ambitious fund-raising targets, and we are expanding our continuing education programs which now generate over $4 million in gross revenues for the institution.

One final thought…

State funding for capital improvements on campuses in New Jersey is crucial to our ability to provide and maintain facilities that meet the needs of our students and our faculty.  As most of you know, our state has not supported capital improvements on the campuses since 1988.  Now we have an opportunity for positive change.  The November ballot will include a bond referendum that would provide $750 million to be shared by higher education institutions in New Jersey.

We have been asked to select a critical project that would be shovel-ready and have identified the need for a new building in the main academic corridor to provide additional classrooms and faculty offices.  Based on recently completed plans, we would build an academic building and expect it to house degree programs in the health professions, including undergraduate and graduate programs in nursing, communication disorders, public health, and kinesiology.

Moving these programs into a new building would allow us eventually to begin renovation of Hunziker Wing followed by renovations to all buildings in the academic corridor.  These are long range plans without funding sources yet identified.  To learn more, I invite you to attend a town hall meeting on October 11 at 12:30 p.m. in the Library Auditorium where we will give an overview of fall enrollments, the 2013 budget, and the plans for the academic zone facilities.

For now, our emphasis is on supporting the potential for the November bond referendum.  I have provided at your tables a brief description of the issue.  I hope that you will join me in helping to get the word out about the importance of this initiative.  We need to build public support and we cannot miss this moment of potential funding.

Despite challenges that we face, I remain greatly optimistic for our future and all that we can achieve.

We are professionals with varied areas of expertise, a range of perspectives and roles, a diversity of backgrounds and experiences.  We have our differences.  But we are a community that clearly shares common goals and aspirations, all resulting in the success of our students.  We are strongest when we work together toward these goals.  Let’s continue to move forward, to inspire, and be inspired by our students.  Let’s continue to support the ability of our students to reach their full potential for successful, wonderful lives.

I wish you an academic year full of achievements and look forward to working closely with you.

Thank you.

 

2012-13 New Faculty and Administrators


Faculty:

College of the Arts and Communication

Department of Communication

 

Matthew Crick, Assistant Professor, Tenure Track
Ph.D., Media Studies, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ, 2011
M.S., Broadcast Programming Management and Television Production, City University of New York, Brooklyn, NY, 2000
B.A., Media Arts, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ,1993

Regina Pappalardo, Assistant Professor, Tenure Track
M.F.A., Writing, Emerson College, Boston, MA, 2001
B.A., English, Hofstra University, Hempstead, NY, 1993

Department of Music

Sandra Katherine Dackow, Assistant Professor, One Year Only
Ph.D., Music, Eastman School of Music, Rochester, NY, 1987
M.M., Eastman School of Music, Rochester, NY, 1977
B.M., Eastman School of Music, Rochester, NY, 1973

Christos M. Cotsakos College of Business

Department of Accounting and Law

KwangJoo Koo, Instructor, Tenure Track
Doctoral Student, Accounting, Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA, Expected Completion, 2012
M.A., Economics, State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY, 2007
B.S., Mathematics, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, 2003

Department of Economics, Finance, and Global Business

Priya Nagaraj, Assistant Professor, One Year Only
Ph.D., Economics, The Graduate School and University Center, City University of New York, NY, 2012
Master’s, Business Economics, Delhi University, New Delhi, India, 1997
Bachelor’s, Economics, Delhi University, New Delhi, India, 1995

John D. Williams, Instructor, Tenure Track
Doctoral Student, Personal Financial Planning, Texas Tech University, Expected Completion 2012
M.S., Finance, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, Texas, 2011
B.A., Economics, University of Georgia, 2003
Credentials as a Certified Financial Planner, 2007

Department of Marketing and Management

Chen-ho Chao, Associate Professor, Tenure Track
Ph.D., Business Administration, John Cook School of Business, Saint Louis University, St. Louis, MO, 2006
M.B.A., University of Missouri, Columbia, MO., 2001
Bachelor of Commerce, Business Administration, College of Commerce, National Chengchi University, Taipei, Taiwan, R.O.C., 1998

Sharon Simmons, Instructor, Tenure Track
Doctoral Student, Entrepreneurship and Emerging Enterprises, Whitman School of Management, Syracuse University, Syracuse, NY, Expected Completion, 2012
J.D., University of Virginia School of Law, Charlottesville, VA, 1994
M.S., Accounting, McIntire School of Commerce, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, 1994
B.S., Accounting, Hampton University, Hampton, VA, 1991

Department of Professional Sales

Bahar Ashnai, Instructor, Tenure Track
Doctoral Student, Business Marketing, Manchester Business School, University of Manchester, United Kingdom, Expected Completion, 2012
M.Sc., Marketing and E-Commerce, Lulea University of Technology, Sweden, 2006
B.Sc., Electrical Engineering, Shahid Beheshti University, Iran, 2003

Sudha Mani, Visiting Assistant Professor, One Year Only
Ph.D., Business Administration, University of Western Ontario, Canada, 2007
Master of Business Economics, University of Delhi, India, 1998
Bachelor of Commerce, University of Delhi, India, 1996

College of Education

Department of Educational Leadership and Professional Studies

Ellen Pozzi, Instructor, Tenure Track
Doctoral Student, Library and Information Science, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ, Expected Completion, 2012
Master of Library and Information Science, School of Communication and Information, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ, 2003
B.A., Business Administration, Rutgers College, 1980

Department of Elementary and Early Childhood Education

David Fuentes, Assistant Professor, Tenure Track
Ph.D., Curriculum and Instruction, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA, 2012
M.Ed., Multicultural/ESL Education, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA, 2005
B.A., Legal Studies, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA, 2002

Nicole Walsh, Instructor, One Year Only
Ed.D. Program, Elementary Education, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ, 2008-09
M.S., Education, Bank Street College, New York, NY, 2005
B.A., Liberal Studies, Eugene Lang College, New School University, New York, NY, 2000

Department of Secondary and Middle School Education

Tony Speed, Assistant Professor, Tenure Track
Ph.D., Educational Policy Studies and Social Foundations, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL, 2011
M.A., English Education, Teachers College, Columbia University, New York, NY, 2005
B.A., English Literature, Saint Peter’s College, Jersey City, NJ, 2003

Department of Special Education and Counseling

Michelle Gimenez Hinkle, Assistant Professor, Tenure Track
Ph.D., Counseling and Human Development, Kent State University, Kent, OH, 2011
M.A., Counseling, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN, 2006
B.S., Human Development and Family Studies, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO, 2000

Manina Urgolo Huckvale, Associate Professor, Tenure Track
Ed.D., Higher Education Administration, Seton Hall University, South Orange, NJ, 1994
M.P.A., Health Care Track, Seton Hall University, South Orange, NJ, 1986
M.A., Special Education, Kean College, Union, NJ, 1976
B.A., Speech Pathology and Audiology, Montclair State College, Upper Montclair, NJ, 1974

Kathleen Dunn Priestley, Instructor, One Year Only
PreK-3 Yearly Institutes, Harvard University, 2008–09 and 2012
M.E., Early Childhood/Special Education, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ, 1977
B.A., Elementary/Early Childhood Education Special Education, Boston College, Chestnut Hill, MA, 1974

College of Humanities and Social Sciences

Department of Africana World Studies

Danielle Wallace, Instructor, Tenure Track
Doctoral Student, African American Studies, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA, Expected Completion, 2013
M.A., African American Studies, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA, 2004
B.A., Black Studies, State University of New York, New Paltz, NY, 2002

Department of English

Matthew Kendrick, Assistant Professor, Tenure Track
Ph.D., Critical and Cultural Studies, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, 2011
M.A., English, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY, 2006
B.A., English, University of New Hampshire, 2005

Department of History

Rochisha Narayan, Assistant Professor, Tenure Track
Ph.D., History, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ, 2011
Master of Philosophy in History, Delhi University, Delhi, India, 2005
Master of Arts in History, Delhi University, Delhi, India, 2002
Bachelor of Arts in History, St Stephen’s College, Delhi University, Delhi, India, 2000

Department of Political Science

Min Hee Go, Instructor, Tenure Track
Doctoral Candidate, Political Science, American Politics and Comparative Politics, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, Expected Completion, 2012
M.A., Political Science, University of Chicago, IL, 2006
B.A., English Language and Literature and Political Science, Ewha Womens University, Seoul, South Korea, 2004

Yvonne Wollenberg, Assistant Professor, One Year Only
Ph.D., Political Science, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ, 1993
M.A., Social Science, William Paterson University, Wayne, NJ, 1984
B.A., Journalism, University of Northern Colorado, 1976

Department of Psychology

David Rivera, Instructor, Tenure Track
Doctoral Candidate, Counseling Psychology, Teachers College, Columbia University, New York, NY, Expected Completion, 2012
M.S., Clinical Community Counseling, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, 2004
B.S., Psychology, University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY, 1998

Department of Sociology

Wendy Christensen, Assistant Professor, Tenure Track
Ph.D., Sociology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI, 2010
M.S., Sociology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI, 2004
B.A., Sociology, State University of New York, Stony Brook, NY, 2002

Gohar Petrossian, Assistant Professor, Tenure Track
Ph.D., Criminal Justice, Rutgers University, Newark, NJ, 2012
M.A., Criminal Justice, John Jay College of Criminal Justice, New York, NY, 2006
B.A., Political Science, Hartwick College, Oneonta, NY, 2000
B.A., Teaching ESL, Gyumri State Pedagogical University, Armenia, 1999

College of Science and Health

Department of Biology

Emily Monroe, Assistant Professor, Tenure Track
NIH IRACDA Postdoctoral Fellow, Center for Marine Biotechnology and Biomedicine, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California, San Diego, 2009-Present
Ph.D., Molecular and Cellular Biology and Pathobiology, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC, 2008
B.S., Marine Science, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC, 2002

Department of Communication Disorders

Yan Yu, Instructor, Tenure Track
Doctoral Student, Speech-Language-Hearing Services, The Graduate Center, CUNY, Expected Completion, 2012
M.A., Communication Science and Disorders, St. John’s University, NY, 2005
M.A., English Education, Hubei University, Wuhan, China, 2000
B.A., English, Hubei University, Wuhan, China, 1994

Kristen Victorino, Assistant Professor, Tenure Track
Ph.D., Speech-Language-Hearing Sciences, The Graduate Center, CUNY, New York, NY, 2011
M.S., Speech-Language Pathology, Emerson College, Boston, MA, 1999
B.S., Communication Sciences and Disorders, James Madison University, Harrisonburg, VA, 1997

Department of Computer Science

Christopher Leberknight, Assistant Professor, Tenure Track
Ph.D., Computer Information Systems, New Jersey Institute of Technology, Newark, NJ, 2009
M.S., Computer Information Systems, New Jersey Institute  of Technology, Newark, NJ, 2001
M.A., Computer Science, Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey, New Brunswick, NJ, 1996

Department of Environmental Science

Michael Griffiths, Assistant Professor, Tenure Track
Ph.D., Physical Geography/Geochemistry, School of Environmental and Life Sciences, University of Newcastle, NSW, Australia, 2010
M.S., Geosciences, Department of Geosciences, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA, 2006
B.S., Geosciences, School of Geosciences, University of Wollongong, NSW, Australia, 2004

Department of Kinesiology

Sungwon Bae, Assistant Professor, Tenure Track
Ph.D., Physical Education/Sport Administration, Florida State University, FL, 2004
M.S., Sports Administration, Ohio University, Athens, OH, 1998
B.S., Physical Education, Yeungnam University, Kyungsan, South Korea, 1994

Anthony Girardi, Instructor, One Year Only
M.A., Physical Education, Montclair State College, Upper Montclair, NJ, 1994
B.S., Business Administration, Montclair State College, Upper Montclair, NJ, 1981

Racine Emmons Hindelong, Assistant Professor, Tenure Track
Ed. D., Applied Physiology, Teachers College, Columbia University, New York, NY, 2009
M.A., Motor Learning and Control, Teachers College, Columbia University, New York, NY, 2004
B.S., Cardiac Rehabilitation and Exercise Science, Ithaca College, Ithaca, NY, 2000

Department of Nursing

Leo Felix Jurado, Instructor, Tenure Track
Collaborative Doctoral Program, Urban Health Systems, Rutgers University, UMDNJ, and NJIT
M.A., Delivery of Nursing Services, New York University, New York, NY, 1991
B.A., English, St. Paul University, Tuguegarao City, Philippines, 1988
B.S., Nursing, St. Paul University, Tuguegarao City, Philippines, 1986

Daria Napierkowski, Assistant Professor, Tenure Track
D.N.P., University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, Newark, NJ, 2008
M.S., Advanced Practice Nursing and Education, William Paterson University, Wayne, NJ, 1999
B.S., Nursing, Pace University, New York, NY, 1982

Kimberly Buff Prado, Assistant Professor, Tenure Track
D.N.P., University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, Newark, NJ, 2010
M.S., Nursing, Acute Care Track and Adult Health, UMDNJ, Newark, NJ, 1995
B.S., Nursing, Alfred University, Alfred, NY, 1988.

Department of Public Health

Marianne Sullivan, Assistant Professor, Tenure Track
D.P.H. Sociomedical Sciences, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, New York, NY, 2008
M.P.H., Behavioral Sciences, University of California, Berkeley, CA, 1995
B.A., Cultural Anthropology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, 1991

Administrators:

College of Science and Health

Dr. Kenneth Wolf, Dean, College of Science and Health
Ph.D., Communication Disorders, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI
M.A., Speech and Hearing, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA
B.A., Speech and Hearing, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA
Former Associate Dean for Faculty Affairs, College of Medicine, Charles R. Drew University of Medicine and Science, Los Angeles, CA

Office of the Provost

Dr. Claudia Schrader, Associate Provost for Academic Development
Ed.D. International and Transcultural Studies, Teachers College, Columbia University, New York, NY
M.Ed., Instructional Practice in Special Education, Teachers College, Columbia University, New York, NY
M.A., Special Education, Teachers College, Columbia University, New York, NY
B.A., Africana Studies and Journalism, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJFormer Assistant Provost and Acting Associate Provost, Medgar Evers College, CUNY, Brooklyn, NY

Administration and Finance

Eric Rosenberg, Chief Information Officer
M.B.A., Organizational Behavior, Long Island University, Brooklyn, NY
B.S., Management, Long Island University, Brooklyn, NY
Former Associate Vice President for Technology and Information Services/Chief Information Officer, Stevens Institute of Technology, Hoboken, NJ

Institutional Advancement

Steve Michalek, Director of Major Gifts
B.A., Communication, William Paterson University, Wayne, NJ
Former Senior Campaign Director, Lynch Development Associates

College of the Arts and Communication

Jane B. Stein, Executive Director of University Performing Arts
M.B.A., Baruch College, City University of New York, New York, NY
B.S., Journalism, Kent State University, Kent, Ohio
Former Director, Berrie Center for Performing and Visual Arts, Ramapo College, and Director of Cultural and Educational Programs, New Jersey Meadowlands Environmental Center, Lyndhurst, NJ

Enrollment Management

Matthew Di Bartolomeo, Assistant Director of Graduate Admissions
M.A. Candidate, Public and Organizational Relations, Montclair State University, Montclair, NJ, Expected Completion, 2012
B.S., Business Administration, Ramapo College, Mahwah, NJ, 2007
Former Student Coordinator, School of Systems and Enterprises, Stevens Institute of Technology, Hoboken, NJ