Humanities

Humanities Track

 2014 Humanities Honor Students

The Humanities Honors Track provides an exploration of the interdisciplinary relations between literature, history, and philosophy. It is open to students from all majors in the University who wish to enrich their major field of study with this broader cultural context or who enjoy the life of the mind in reading, discussing and writing about ideas.

The Humanities Track provides a direction for the examination of human, social, and universal nature that connects with the social and natural science but that also has its own value. Drawing from the realms of literature, art, music, philosophy, history, languages, and religion, this track allows the student to examine a wide variety of human ideas, actions, values, and creative productions from Classical Greece to our current Modern and Post-Modern era.

Like other Tracks, the Humanities Honors Track functions like a minor in the student’s curriculum, providing a distinct set of courses to enrich the student’s major and the general university experience. The initial work in the Track focuses upon foundational ideas and themes in Western culture, while the research projects encompass whatever culture(s) that suits the student’s interests. Many students have explored the culture of their ancestors, as others have looked at Greek poetry or modern jazz.

Students complete a year-long Seminar (Seminars 1 & 2) examining the connections between literature, history, and philosophy in Western culture and then take one Colloquium limited to one cultural period, such as Classical Greece and Rome, Medieval, Enlightenment, or Contemporary. The culmination of the study is the year-long research and thesis project usually in the senior year, offering the opportunity to work independently with the guidance of a selected faculty member.

The completion of this project provides not only a fitting expression of the student’s college accomplishments, but also a valuable representation of their abilities for graduate school and future employers. There are courses available for both daytime and evening students. 

 

The Track is Ideal For:

  • Students of all majors
  • Students who enjoy reading, discussing, and writing about ideas

 

Curriculum:

 

All students take TWO of the following four Seminars:

Humanities Honors Seminar I (HUMH 1990)

Representations of Humanity Past and Present

Humanities Honors Seminar II (HUMH 2000)

Representations of Humanity Past and Present

Humanities Honors Seminar III (HUMH 2010)-Evening

Humanities and Technology in Today’s World

Humanities Honors Seminar IV (HUMH 2020)-Evening

Representations of Humanities through Historical Perspectives 

Plus ONE of the following four Colloquia: 

The 20th Century and Its Discontents (HUMH 3000)

The Enlightenment: Origins of Modern Consciousness (HUMH 3010)

Medieval and Renaissance Culture (HUMH 3020)

Classical Tradition and Christian Civilization (HUMH 3030)

Plus TWO semester to research and write their thesis: 

Humanities Honors Thesis Seminar I (HUMH 4010)

Research

Humanities Honors Thesis Seminar II (HUMH 4020)

Writing 

 

What projects have students completed in the past? 

Students in the Humanities Track have produced a wide variety of theses, some titles are included here:

Thesis Title

Student Name

Year

The Quest to Educational Equality for Undocumented Immigrants

 

Amanda Clark

 

2014

The Civilian Aspect of the Battle of Gettysburg

 

Lindsey Freedman

 

2014

The Skeleton of the Hero

 

Ariel Gungil

 

2014

Optimal Experience and Aesthetics in Music Performance

 

Inigo Hermann

 

2014

Heritage for the Future; On Tracing Cultural Developments and Perceptions of Contemporary Literature

 

Julian Kazan

 

2014

Cheating has Changed the Way We Perceive Sports

 

Andrew Shapiro

 

2014

"El Latine Doctus": Latin's Influence on the English Language and Its Impact on Education

 

Kelly Statz

 

2014

Methods and Motives of American Homeschooling: A Study of a Growing Educational Trend

 

Barbara Van Vugt

 

2014

Woman as Commander In Chief

 

Jessica Bonilla

 

2013

The Role of Accounting in the Enron Era: The Rise and Fall of Arthur Andersen

 

Erica Calella

 

2013

The Development of Filipino Nursing in America

 

Jessica Camacho

 

2013

Ethics of Human Entropy

 

Christopher Koschier

 

2013

Rethinking Napoleonic Military History: The First Example of Modern Global Total War?

 

Richard Siegler

 

2013

Everyman Drowns Differently

 

Isabel Anreus

 

2012

Fragmented

 

Krista Averill

 

2012

Story of Coming to the United States of America

 

Kimberly Den Heyer

 

2012

Unraveling the Unknown: The Social Necessity and Emergence of Cryptozoology

 

Gregory Schmidt

 

2012

Diagnosing Psychological Disorders Cultural Considerations and the Effects of Globalization

 

Shannon Tarolli

 

2012

Religious Pluralism
 

Helainer Terhune

 

2012

History of Puerto Race and its Effects on Cultural Authenticity, and the Role of Compromise

 

Carla Valledor

 

2012

The Puritan Family: Religion Lived

 

Jennifer Van Wyck

 

2012

When Numbers Rule the World: An Analysis of the Cultural Qualifications of Numerology

 

Ashley Weinstein

 

2012

Shadows on the Air: An Exploration of Collective Experience through Poetry

 

Patrick Boyle

 

2011

The Philosophy of Traveling as a Musician in the United States

 

Eric Dryburgh

 

2011

Raven

 

Crystal Lawson

 

2011

"Where Complaining is a Crime, Hope Becomes Despair"

 

Bruce Spadaccini Jr.

 

2011

Ensemble: A Short Story Cycle

 

Renvie Tacayon

 

2011

The Feminist Deconstruction of American Folklore and Fairytales

 

Derek R Sloan

 

2006

The Administration of Deceptive Virtue: The Machiavellian Moment in the Neoconservative Bush Administration

 

Steven Baker

 

2004

Walden: Transcendentalism and the American Dream

 

Ariana Den Bleyker

 

2004

The Simpsons and Allusion: An Analysis of Association and its Effect on Viewer Experience

 

Erika Vasquez

 

2004

Transplanting El Cactus: From Mexican to Latino

 

Cesar Cazales

 

2003

Globalization

 

Irene Mburu

 

2002

The Real World: Life in a Fish-Bowl

 

Cicile Samiz

 

2002

Values and Marketing

 

James DeMatteis

 

2001

An Overview of the Philosophical Implication in the History of Psychology in Society

 

Jeff Duong

 

2001

Sweetest Tongue Has Sharpest Tooth: The Evolution of "Little Red Riding Hood"

 

Trudi Van Dyke

 

2001

Hesitate- The Existentialist crossroads of Generation X through the lyrics of The Smashing Pumpkins

 

Paul Bonney

 

2000

What it Means to Be Human

 

Jennifer Carberry

 

2000

The Vampire Legend

 

Amy Lorfink

 

2000

"The subjection of the Negro"

 

Maurice Streeter

 

2000

Trickster: From Hermes to Carnival Fool, and Harlequin

 

Sarah Mirza

 

1999

"Il Trovatore" de Giuseppe Verdi Y "El Trovador" de Antonio Garcia Gutierrez Comparacion Y Contraste

 

Misslady Cifuentes

 

1998

The Media and Society: Who is in Control?

 

Craig Germain

 

1998

Does the British Monarchy have a Future?

 

Michael Marino

 

1996

In Search for the Feminist Roles of the Female in the works of Willa Carther, Zora Neale Hurston and Edith Wharton

 

Dawn Olson

 

1996

Salvation of Sanctification Need I one, the Other or Both?

 

Rae-Shan N. Barclift

 

1995

I Love you?

 

Alexa Pereira

 

1995

Sigmund Freud, James Joyce, Franz Kafka

 

Svetlana Bochstein

 

1993

War, Women and Change

 

Barbara Martin

 

1992

The Polarization of Apollo and Dionysus

 

Jason Carucci

 

1991

The Last Laugh

 

Amy Stucki

 

1991

Women and Change in Colonial Mexico: Race and Class in the Sixteenth Century

 

Sonia Mazzeo

 

1990

Marriage: An Analysis of the Elements Needed for it to be Healthy

 

Stacy Tankel

 

1990

The Idea of Justice as Presented in the Oresteia Plays of Aeschylus, Sophocles and Euripides

 

Stephanie Schmidt

 

1988

The Greek Vision of Heroism from Homer to Aristotle
 

Susan Varghese

 

1988

AYN Rand and Objectivism

 

E. M. Sorber

 

1987

Freedom and the Artist Thesis

 

Olyia Klymenko

 

1986

The Philosophies of Plato, Dante, and Dewey in relation to the Education of the Individual

 

Donna Jones

 

1985

Conservative Politics in Shakespeare's Histories

 

Benjamin Arah

 

1984

"Politeia Within Oneself Achieved Through Plato's Myths"

 

Elsa Osso

 

1984

A Comparison of East-West Thought on Ways Man Achieves Liberation from False Consciousness in Everyday Life

 

Roy Amato

 

 

Everyman Drowns Differently
 

 

Isabel Anreus

 

 

Magical Realism: Focus on Tom Robbins

 

Davinder Bhamra

 

 

Beyond the Senses

 

Christie Bozza

 

 

Gothic Conventions

 

Jessica Burke

 

 

The Fin-de-Siecle

 

Lisa Byrne

 

 

Allegory in the Poetry of William Blake as an Answer to the Physical/Spiritual Duality

 

Agustina Carando

 

 

Property as a Virtue in Aristotle's Politics

 

William Clark

 

 

Total Quality Management's Impact on Human Behavior

 

Kathy Colligan

 

 

"Can I Buy Those Genes?"

 

David Fernicola Jr.

 

 

Utopia

 

Tom Hall

 

 

Does God Make Us Think? An Investigation of the Relationship between Abstract Reasoning and Religiosity

 

Nadia Nieves

 

 

Gaining Korean Culture through My Family: Sunday Gatherings

 

Susanna Park

 

 

Recording American Democracy

 

Tyler J. Peckio

 

 

Spiritual Decadence in Modern American Society: A Critical Analysis

 

Ronald Petrucelli

 

 

Who is the Judge? An Examination of the Concept of Justice and the Good Man in Aristotle and Plato

 

Yvonne Raley

 

 

Holy Mother Church: Anti-Catholic Satire in Shakespeare's Hamelt

 

Caroline Schmidt

 

 

The Role of Authority in Our Lives

 

Lois Scian

 

 

Third Wave Feminism: The Voices of Rebellion and the Cries of Opposition

 

Nancy Walsh

 

 

 

How do I enroll?

To enroll in the Humanities Honors Track, contact the Director, Dr. John Peterman, at (973) 720-3030 or at petermanj@wpunj.edu. You could also contact Jan Pinkston at (973) 720-3776 or at pinkstonj@wpunj,edu. A completed track application must also be submitted to the Honors College. 

About the Track Director:

Dr. John Peterman got his Ph.D. in 1980 from the Pennsylvania State University. He is interested in ancient Greek philosophy (particularly Plato), American pragmatism (particularly Dewey). He teaches courses in Ancient Philosophy , Plato, Aristotle, environmental Ethics, and Life Science Ethics. He coordinates the Humanities Honors Track. He is also an avid hiker and has successfully completed the New York City Marathon three times (best time: 4:15).

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