Related Courses

The Gandhian Forum for Peace & Justice is not an academic program. Nevertheless, there are many courses taught at William Paterson University -- across many departments -- that take up in a substantial way the Gandian Forum's concerns of peace and justice. Here is a listing of some of them, and we urge all interested students to consider signing up for one or more of them. (Please let us know of other relevant courses.)


ANTH 2020 - DIVERSITY AND EQUITY IN SCHOOLS
Schools are central to the socialization of youngsters and to the formation and maintenance of modern nation-states. American schools transmit core values and knowledge and support a meritocracy where social mobility seems the outcome of talent and effort. While offering freedom and opportunity, they reproduce social structures and perpetuate systems of class, gender, and race inequality. This course critically analyzes the role that schools play in the cultural production of the "educated" person. It identifies links between school practices and the community, the state, and the economy, which help explain the disproportionate failure of disadvantaged groups. The course challenges future teachers to think about schools as sites of intense cultural politics and to consider the effects of history and power on educational processes.

ANTH 3100 - GLOBALIZATION AND DEVELOPMENT: ANTHROPOLOGICAL PERSPECTIVES
The last three decades have seen growing tensions between two powerful constructs that have framed knowledge of the unevenness of our world: development and globalization, the meanings of which are still debated. This course will focus on four major themes that recur in the debates surrounding globalization and development: poverty and inequality, individual states and transnational institutions, social and cultural movements on globalization’s impacts, global rights regime, and global health and environment. The broad approach taken in this course will be "anthropological politicaleconomy," which means that attention will be paid to the ways in which three axes of social life—the culturalideological (meaning producing actions), the economic (commodity production and exchange), and the political (power struggles) come together to produce globalization and development as social phenomena. The course will have a large focus on the continent of Asia, but will also draw upon other regions of the world, including Euro-America, that shape the intensity, direction, and form of globalization.

ANTH 3410 - LAW IN SOCIETY AND CULTURE
This course examines mechanisms societies have developed to resolve disputes. Comparing American society to other industrial and preindustrial societies, law and political organizations are shown to have cultural ways of coping with conflict strongly linked to variations in subsistence, economy, and social stratification.

ASN 2580 / HIST 2580 - ASIAN AMERICAN EXPERIENCE
An introduction to the histories of Americans of Asian ancestry from the late eighteenth century to the recent past, this course focuses on the experiences of peoples from China, Japan, Korea, the Philippines, Southeast Asia, and South Asia. It explores patterns and similarities in experience, while also addressing differences stemming from nationality, class, gender, and colonial and postcolonial relationships to the United States. Within a broad chronological framework, the course approaches the Asian American experience thematically. Topics will include: the impact of U. S. imperialism on Asian migration; the significance of Asian labor in the development of the American West; anti-Asian movements and exclusion; community formation and ethnic identity; stereotypical images of Asian-Americans, from the Yellow Peril to the Model Minority; urban and suburban experiences; interaction with other ethnicities and social movements; and the forging of a pan-Asian movement in the 1960's.

ASN 3680 / HIST 3680 / WGS 3680 - WOMEN AND WAR
This course will look at how war and the preparation for war have affected the lives, hopes, and images of women around the world. It will examine roles of women in war, military service, and militarism in societal development in world history primarily since the eighteenth century with these questions central: What roles have women played in war? Are women victims of conflict alone or are they active participants as well? And how has war helped shape female roles, gender stereotypes, and national mythologies? A broad comparative framework, exploring "Western" and "non-Western" societal experience and analytical approaches, will be adopted throughout.

ASN 4680 / HIST 4680 - GANDHI AND NON-VIOLENCE
The course will study the life, career, and philosophy of Mahatma Gandhi in relation to the political and social development of modern India and in comparison to other anti-colonial resistance movements. The course will also consider different approaches to historical understanding and representation including biography, autobiography, psychohistory, and subaltern studies, as well as political and intellectual narrative and analysis.

AWS 2250 - RACE, GENDER AND SOCIAL JUSTICE
This course analyzes multiple forms of social oppression and inequality based on race (and color), sex (and gender), sexual orientation (and identity), and class in the United States. It will examine systemic aspects of social oppression in different periods and contexts and the ways that systems of social oppression manifest themselves on individual, cultural, institutional and/or global levels thus becoming self-perpetuating but not wholly unaltered structures. Individual and group agency, strategies of resistance, and visions for change will also be studied.

CIED 2050 - FOUNDATIONS OF BILINGUAL AND MULTICULTURAL EDUCATION
This course will provide participants with the knowledge necessary for understanding the historical, political, legal, social and educational aspects of bilingual and multicultural education and how such knowledge influences teacher practices in Bilingual and ESL programs. Critical discussion of historical and current struggles for access to education in American history is central to this course. Another key focus of this course is learning about methods through which teachers can effectively explore and celebrate the diversity in language, culture, religion, gender, ability and other areas inherent in American classrooms through engaging in culturally relevant instruction; incorporating meaningful, authentic assessment; and including multiple perspectives throughout the curriculum. New research in the areas of bilingual and multicultural education will be examined, and students will analyze and apply best practices based on this research.

COMM 2360 - FILM AND CIVIC ENGAGEMENT
This course is designed to help expand students' understanding of social engagement and activism on local and global levels. The course will illustrate the vast capabilities of film medium in exploring social issues, raising consciousness, and encouraging viewers’ active engagement on behalf of social causes. Through weekly viewing and analysis of films dealing with a variety of pressing social issues, the course will attempt to enhance students’ awareness and inspire them to become active in their communities as agents of positive change. The course will focus on both social values and aesthetic aspects of the films.

COMM 2620 - COMMUNICATING FOOD
Food is a fundamental dimension of 21st century life, local and global. This class uses food as a lens to examine the structure of our modern world focusing on issues of global health, social justice and environmental justice. Using a variety of approaches, we will examine food as central to social, economic and political life, examining the ways in which social oppression impacts food production, distribution and consumption based on factors of race, gender, and socio-economic class.

COMM 3560 - CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY
The course explores the concept(s) of corporate social responsibility (CSR), philanthropy and corporate strategy. Various real-world organizational CSR programs are analyzed to examine the scope and complexity of CSR and its impact on global and local business and society,

ENG 3690 / HIST 3690 - IMAGINING WAR: INTELLECTUAL AND CULTURAL RESPONSES TO WARFARE
This course studies World War I as imagined and remembered through primary sources, memoir, poetry, fiction, film, media, and the visual arts. Works may include Pat Barker’s Regeneration, the war poetry of Sassoon, Owen and others, the films All’s Quiet on the Western Front and Oh, What a Lovely War, fiction and autobiographical writing by several women including Virginia Woolf and Vera Britain, and studies such as Paul Fussell’s The Great War and Modern Memory.

FR 2000 - FRENCH COLONIAL LEGACIES
This course offers an introduction to the historical and cultural diversity of various- primarily non-European-French-speaking regions of the world. It discusses French colonialism and its distinct and complex legacies in different areas of sub-Saharan Africa, North Africa, North America, Indo-China, the Caribbean, and France itself. Through historical, literary, and cultural readings and cinema, this course traces the effects of colonization on both the colonizer and the colonized, including its particular impact on women and children; thus grappling with issues of power and oppression, sexism, race and gender, enslavement and inequality, and justice and freedom. Taught in English.

GEO 3410 - GEOGRAPHY OF NORTH AMERICAN CITIES
This course examines North American cities and suburbs from a geography perspective. It is organized into three parts as follows. In the first part, students will be introduced to concepts and theories in urban geography. The second part examines major trends in the evolution and development of North American cities and the internal (spatial) structure and characteristics of these cities, including land use patterns, ecoomic activities, transportation, housing and social differentiation. The third part focuses on the demographic, economic, social, and environmental problems resulting from urban growth, and how urban policies and programs are formulated and implemented to address these problems.

HIST 2510 - MODERN WOMEN AND GENDER
A survey of women's and gender history in the modern era, the course draws comparisons between major world regions. Instructor may focus on one or more area of geographic expertise, exploring how societies have constructed gender and sexual identity; how race, ethnicity, class and other social differences have informed wormen's experiences over time; and how societies have developed systemic inequalities and forms of gender-based oppression. Special attention is given to the role of the state, the evolution of feminism. civil and human rights movements, and how individuals and collectives envision and work toward global feminism, sexual and reproductive liberation, and social justice.

HIST 2530 - AMERICAN SLAVERY
This course examines the institution of American slavery from its early beginnings to 1867. Special attention is paid to the life of the enslaved black: his religion, his personality, his culture, his acculturation, and his heritage.

HIST 2550 / LAS 2550 - HISTORY OF LATINOS/LATINAS
From the mid - 19th century to the present, Latinos and Latinas have fought for equity and justice as members of society in the United States. However, the historical record shows that the heritage populations in annexed territories and immigrants from Latin America and their descendants have been excluded on the basis of race, class, and gender. This class will examine various historical interpretations of imperialism, immigration, gender and class bias, labeling, language, and citizenship as they apply to Latinos/Latinas. Utilizing a variety of primary and secondary sources, the class will develop a distinctly historical awareness of the legal, political, and human rights issues behind the Latino/Latina presence in the United States. The course will also examine several past and present Latino movements for social justice and their legacy for change in U.S. society.

HIST 2580 - ASIAN AMERICAN EXPERIENCE (see ASN 2580)

HIST 2910 - HISTORY OF THE CIVIL RIGHTS MOVEMENT
An introduction to the Civil Rights Movement in the U.S. from 1955 to 1970. Drawing on interviews, speeches, autobiographies, film, and monographs, the course explores the Movements historical and ideological origins within the context of racial, gender and class inequality in the U.S. society. It discusses how African American men and women, along with whites and other peoples, fought against discriminatory legislation, policies, and practices. The course focuses on the evolution of the African American struggle for social justice and political equality and concludes with the Movements legacy and impact on American society and other movements for social justice.

HIST 3510 - PUBLIC HISTORY
This course introduces students to the non-teaching professional uses of history. Students will examine the theories, methods, varieties, and problems associated with what is called applied or public history. Because the history if every community is embedded in the life stories and experiences of its members, learning units will focus on the use of oral history in interpreting a community's past, enabling students to understand history from the bottom up.

HIST 3650 - THE PACIFIC WAR: JAPAN AND THE SECOND WORLD WAR IN ASIA
The course examines the Japanese experience during the 1931-1945 era and postwar occupation to better understand the political, economic, and social toll of the war and its impact on the development of Japanese society. The course makes extensive use of rare film materials to bring the experience closer.

HIST 3680 - WOMEN AND WAR (see ASN 3680)

HIST 3690 - IMAGINING WAR (see ENG 3690)

HIST 4170 - WAR AND SOCIETY
The history of war and the interrelationship of conflict and conflict resolution in the development of human societies are treated in a comparative framework. Military institutions, science and technology, and the cultural treatment of war are among the topics included.

HIST 4680 - GANDHI AND NON-VIOLENCE (see ASN 4680)

LAS 2020 / WGS 2020 - LATINOS AND LATINAS IN THE US
This course will analyze the historical and contemporary experiences of Latinos and Latinas in the United States. Latina/os in the U.S. are the largest minority group and constitute 16 % of the nation’s total population. The course will use a gendered perspective to examine the social, economic, political and cultural conditions that have shaped the lives of Latinas and Latinos in U.S. history and society. It will explore the diversity of Latina/os in the United States, by drawing on the comparative histories of Chicanos and Mexican Americans, Puerto Ricans, Dominicans, Cubans, and Central and South Americans to understand how different groups negotiate their presence in this country. Emphasis will be placed on broader issues such as Latina/o identity and its relationship to intersecting categories of class, race/ethnicity, gender, sexuality, and language.

LAS 2550 - HISTORY OF LATINOS/LATINAS (see HIST 2550)

MGT 3600 - INNOVATION AND SOCIAL ENTREPRENEURSHIP
This course focuses on how the next generation of visionaries will shape our society and create strategies for solving society’s problems through mission-driven enterprises. Students will learn how to define social good, assess market forces, recognize opportunities, and create innovative solutions that blur societal, government and business objectives, and engage stakeholders in local, national or global communities. Students will explore innovation and social entrepreneurship as purposeful disciplines that impact quality of life, social and environmental objectives, employment, wealth creation, sustainability, and ethics. Student teams will have opportunity to develop a concept plan focused on solving a societal problem of their choice. This course will be of benefit to all majors.

MUS 2551 - ROCK MUSIC: DIVERSITY AND JUSTICE
This course is a chronological survey of the history of American Popular Music documenting the power relations in the music industry, both systematically and individually. Also included are the roles the different performers of the different genres of music play in protest and civil rights movements.

PBHL 2550 - HEALTH CARE AND HEALTH POLICY
This course is for non-majors. It provides an overview of health care in the United States. Who receives and who pays for health care are important issues that individuals, communities and ultimately, our society must address. Access, cost, and financing are central themes of this course. Policy issues are examined with consideration of the roles played by government, consumers, advocates and other interest groups. Comparative health care models are used to debate ethical, political, economic and public health issues.

PBHL 2950 - DISPARITIES IN HEALTH
This course will explore the health disparities that exist among and between groups of people based on the categories of race, ethnicity,gender and class. Situated within the historical record of public health in the United States, this course will review the social, political, cultural, legal and ethical factors that influence health disparities. Significant attention will be given to the idea that health and access to health care is a basic human right in a just society.

PBHL 3140 / WGS 3140 - REPRODUCTIVE RIGHTS
This course explores the multifaceted and complex issues related to reproductive rights from an interdisciplinary perspective. The controversies surrounding reproductive technologies, pregnancy and childbirth, birth control, foster care, abortion, and adoption are explored with particular focus on public policy and its impact on the private lives of individual women.

PBHL 3150 - FOOD AND COMMUNITY
This course is an exploration of the complex and challenging public health issues related to the globalization of our food supply. This course investigates the connections among the current food and food-animal production and distribution systems, food policy, and public health, with an emphasis on the growing movement toward sustainable, community-based systems of agriculture and the citizen’s role in this movement at local, state, national, and global levels. In this course students will integrate theory, practice, and problem-solving strategies in community settings, including community gardens, farmer’s markets, local family farms, food banks, civic organizations, and the larger systems in which these exist.

PBHL 3450 - HEALTH CARE AND HEALTH POLICY
This course is for non-majors. It provides an overview of health care in the United States. Who receives and who pays for health care are important issues that individuals, communities and ultimately, our society must address. Access, cost and financing are central themes of this course. Policy issues are examined with consideration of the roles played by government, consumers, advocates and other interest groups. Comparative health care models are used to debate ethical, political, economic and public health issues.

PHIL 2400 - ETHICS AND COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT
This course considers specific issues in applied ethics such as: abortion, euthanasia, the death penalty, and professional ethics; issues of diversity and equality in regard to race, gender, and economic status; and the extent of our moral obligations to the poor and starving of other countries, to animals, and to the environment. The course will enable students to evaluate their own beliefs about concrete ethical issues and to consider theoretical questions, such as: Where does morality come from? What makes an ethical argument good or bad? What general rules or principles ought we live by?

POL 1100 - INTRODUCTION TO POLITICS
An inquiry into the nature, methodology and subject matter of politics. Basic ideas and problems in the field of politics-- value-free inquiry, freedom, authority, justice, equality, alienation, revolution and change, rights and obligation-- are examined in their philosophical and real-world setting.

POL 1150 - POWER, JUSTICE AND FREEDOM
This course will survey some of the most fundamental concepts in political theory and philosophy, such as justice, freedom, order, power, inequality, peace and conflict. It will also discuss the philosophical traditions underlie these ideas, such as utilitarianism, materialism, idealism, and others. This course will focus on the ways that different political and moral concepts operate in diverse political traditions and examine the unique ethical and epistemological frameworks that give various political traditions and ideologies their distinctiveness and coherence.

POL 1200 - AMERICAN GOVERNMENT This course provides an analysis of the structure and function of basic institutions of American government. The cultural setting, constitutional foundations and policy-making processes are examined in detail. In addition, this course will provide students with a critical understanding of the American political system in comparison to other selected democratic systems in order to prepare them for active and effective citizenship in a democratic society.

POL 2110 - ANCIENT AND MEDIEVAL POLITICAL THEORY
Analyzes, in depth, the political ideas of important classical and medieval philosophers and schools of thought. Ideas on justice, authority, rights and duties, equality, laws and constitutions, and the "good life" are given an analytical and historical perspective.

POL 2120 - MODERN POLITICAL THEORY
This course focuses on major themes in political philosophy and theory from Machiavelli to the twentieth century. Themes emphasized in the course include, but not limited to, unalienable rights, reason, liberty, equality, authority, justice and the law, sovereignty, community, and issues surrounding religion and politics.

POL 2250 - POLITICAL ECONOMY OF THE US
This course is an interdisciplinary study of the political and economic problems of contemporary America. It uses the disciplines of political science and economics to deepen and broaden understanding of issues such as equality, fiscal and monetary policies, political institutional behavior, and militarism

POL 2260 - AMERICAN JUDICIAL SYSTEM
This course examines the role of the courts in the American political system. State courts, federal courts, the criminal justice system, Supreme Court history, and jurisprudence will be examined.

POL 2270 - CIVIC ENGAGEMENT: THEORY AND PRACTICE
This course provides students with academic and experiential opportunities to explore the political foundations of civic engagement, citizenship and community empowerment. To this end, students will explore political theories of democratic citizenship and civic engagement, participate in a meaningful community -based learning experience and engage in written reflection and analysis of their experience. As a requirement of this course, students will spend some time in a community-based organization or agency which will provide the context for the exploration of the course's central theme: civic participation and community engagement are the keys to a healthy democracy.

POL 2280 - AFRICAN AMERICAN POLITICS
An examination and analysis of economic and political power structure and relationships in the black community. Those factors that make black communities relatively powerless; how this powerlessness can be ameliorated; a historical overview of black political participation, as well as a study of the present black impact on the political process.

POL 2290 - LATINO POLITICS IN THE US
This course examines the role of Latino electorates in shaping state and national politics. After a review of the political histories of the various Latino national origin groups, we discuss public policy issues that concern Latinos, the successes and failures of Latino empowerment strategies, and the electoral impact of Latino votes. The class primarily focuses on the three largest Latino national origin groups, Mexican Americans, Puerto Ricans, and Cuban Americans, and the degree to which their political agendas are likely to merge or diverge over the coming years. The question that we return to throughout the course is the degree to which it is accurate to speak of Latino politics and a Latino community. Additionally, this course examines the cross-cutting cleavages of race, class, and gender in the political struggles of the Latino population in the US.

POL 2720 / WGS 2720 - POLITICS AND SEX
What is it like to be female in a male-dominated society? This course critically examines the socio-political construction of patriarchy and the conscious and nonconscious, intentional and unintentional ways in which male supremacy is reproduced in contemporary society. Particular emphasis will be on the mechanisms of social control designed to limit women's participation in society and to ensure the perpetuation of male dominance. As the lens of the course is on the lived experiences of females, the intersections of racism, heterosexism, classism, and ableism will be addressed throughout the course.

POL 3020 - COMPARATIVE RIGHTS
Comparative Rights compares and contrasts the evolution of rights protections in a number of countries, including the United States, Italy, Great Britain, Canada, France, Germany, and New Zealand. Discussion topics include the evolution of democracy and rights in the international community, the development of civil liberties protections within nations, the balancing of powers between various branches of government, and the influence political philosophy has upon judicial decision-making.

POL 3110 - AMERICAN POLITICAL THEORY
This course provides an analysis of American political theory from its origins in English liberalism to the present day, including both mainstream and dissident voices. It evaluates the American political tradition in contrast to the major political ideas of Europe and in terms of the uniqueness of the American historical inheritance and environment.

POL 3210 - POLITICS OF US EDUCATION
This course is designed to familiarize students with key debates concerning the public benefits, costs and effectiveness of public education policy in the United States and the historical relationship between public education and democracy. The course explores the role of political theory in shaping education policy from the colonial period to present. The course also explores the influence of social and psychological theories on U.S. education practices and how academic research can influence the politics surrounding education reform debates. Additionally, the course addresses crucial shifts in US education policy and contemporary debates surrounding funding, curriculum, pedagogy and standards in public education. Broad thematic concerns will include the role of education in a democracy, questions of equity in the American system, the role of federalism in shaping the U.S. education system, and the identification of key players in the U.S. education policy process. Field work will be required.

POL 3240 - CONSTITUTIONAL LAW: THE JUDICIAL PROCESS
Analysis and examination of U.S. Supreme Court decisions in such areas as judicial review, scope of federal power, federal-state relations, commerce, taxing and spending, regulations of economic and property interests, and other sources of legislative and executive power.

POL 3250 - CONSTITUTIONAL LAW: CIVIL LIBERTIES AND CIVIL RIGHTS
Analysis of the concepts and problems associated with the exercise and interpretation of the Bill of Rights and the 13th, 14th, and 15th amendments. Leading decisions of the United States Supreme Court are analyzed and discussed with special attention given to such issues as freedom of speech, press, assembly, religion, privacy, and security, the right to a fair trial, the rights of the accused, due process, and equal protection of the laws.

POL 3290 - WOMEN AND THE LAW IN US
This course will examine the legal and social status of women historically and in modern American society and the law and policy relating to that status. The course will also address legal tools developed to address sexual inequality, and the possibility that law both challenges and supports women's subordination. The course and materials are organized around concrete legal problems of particular and current concern to women. Issues are approached intersectionally, addressing sex, race, sexual orientation and other differences simultaneously. The issue areas will include, but not be limited to: employment, education, family, reproduction, health, sexuality, violence, Equal Rights Amendment, criminal law, and equality theory; and the laws, cases, current statutes and legislative proposals that apply to and affect women.

POL 3400 - INTERNATIONAL LAW
This course examines the evolution of international law up to the present. In addition to its history, rules, and process, it explores such international topics as treaties, customary law, general principles of law, and conflict of laws. Also covered are a variety of international tribunals, organizations, and doctrines.

POL 3420 - INTERNATIONAL POLITICAL ECONOMY
Analyses of global issues -- such as the quest for new international order, world trade dilemmas, economic relations between rich and poor states and their political implications -- from a political- economical perspective.

POL 3430 - THE UNITED NATIONS
A study of the leading international organization in the world today and its role in maintaining security, peacekeeping, economic and social development and human rights. The perspectives of nations from different regional blocs will be examined.

POL 3470 - THE MIDDLE EAST IN WORLD POLITICS
The Middle East -- that region stretching from North Africa to Southwest Asia -- is of tremendous importance in international relations, containing as it does immense oil resources, strategic waterways, colonial legacies, and contending nationalist movements. This course examines both the role of outside powers and local actors in this volatile region.

POL 3480 - WAR AND PEACE
What causes war? What promotes peace? An examination of the economic, political, psychological and other causes of war, and various strategies for preventing it.

POL 3520 - POLITICS OF POVERTY
This course views poverty as a socially constructed artifact-an effect of political ideas and decisions-and a source of continuing political controversy. The course explores the ways in which poverty and inequality are defined and measured as well as the extent of poverty and its effects on different population groups. Various theories that attempt to explain the causes of poverty and prescribe solutions are explored in the context of a study of U.S. poverty policy from the Great Depression through the present. U.S. approaches to poverty are also explored in relation to comparable industrial democracies.

POL 3530 - POLITICS AND LABOR MOVEMENTS
A variety of philosophical, ideological and historical-institutional arrangements related to labor are explored. Emphasis on the origins and development of trade unionism and class consciousness, relations between capital and labor, old and new working class, role of labor in competitive and monopoly capitalism, technology and labor, job satisfaction and alienation under capitalism and socialism.

POL 3550 - POLITICS OF THE ENVIRONMENT
Preserving and improving the natural environment is one of the most critical public policy issues of the twenty-first century. Like all political questions, it is bound up with ideology and power, but it also involves difficult moral and ethical issues, philosophical and economic belief systems and technical and scientific "facts" and their interpretation. this interdisciplinary course provides an overview of the origins and evolution of environmentalism as a philosophical paradigm that is reshaping politics and public policy. The course surveys the history of the environmental decision making both nationally and globally, focusing on specific policy areas through case studies and simulations.

POL 3620 - SOCIAL MOVEMENTS AND POLITICAL CHANGE
This course explores the theory and practice of social (or people's) movements to achieve political results. It examines at least one social movement in depth and several others in less depth, seeking answers to the following questions: Why do people's movements arise when and where they do? What kinds of resources, strategies and tactics do they employ? How do they relate to conventional politics? How do they affect their participants and the larger society? Why do some succeed and others fail?

POL 3700 - FEMINIST THEORY
This course provides an overview of feminist theory from World War II to the present with particular attention to three questions: What are the fundamental assumptions of contemporary feminist theory? How does a feminist analysis influence our understanding of sociopolitical processes? What are the political issues and strategies that emerge from feminist theory?

POL 3730 / WGS 3730 - POLITICS OF SEXUAL VIOLENCE
This course provides an overview of the contemporary issues of sexual violence. It defines the scope and reality of sexual violence and examines the processes by which sexual violence is perpetuated and maintained at the micro-level and the macro-level of society.

POL 4120 - MARXIST POLITICAL THEORY
The intellectual development of Marx and Engels. Earlier philosophical and historical movements (political economy, Utopian socialism, German idealism and working class movements) are given attention to place Marxism in historical perspective.

POL 4140 - CAPITALISM/SOCIALSM
Nineteenth-century origins of socialist theory are analyzed, but emphasis is on twentieth-century schools of socialist theory and practice -- Marxism, Leninism, Trotskyism, Maoism, African socialism, anarcho-communism, women's liberation, the new left, the Greens, and developments in the post-Communist period.

SOC 2220 - PUBLIC SOCIOLOGY AND CIVIC ENGAGEMENT
This course provides students with an understanding of the current public sociology movement, the roots of public sociology in the origins of the discipline, and how public sociologists today are using the tools of sociology in civic engagement efforts. It includes an overview of the sociological perspectives and provides students with opportunities to utilize concepts, theories, and methodologies they learn in the course in civic engagement exercises.

SOC 2410 - MINORITY GROUPS IN AMERICA
This course examines, from a sociological perspective, the experiences of past and present minority groups in the U.S., as defined by race, ethnicity, religion, gender, age, sexual orientation, and disability. Particular emphasis is placed on the social construction of social minorities, recurring patterns in dominant-minority relations, group inclusion and exclusion, differential power, diversity and social justice, and group variations within the larger society.

SOC 2420 - MUSLIMS AND ISLAMIC INSTITUTIONS IN THE UNITED STATES
This course provides students with an understanding of the Muslim communities in the U. S. It will explore the bonds of Ummah (Muslim community) and the meaning of the Muslim American identity. Attention will be paid to the diversity of the American Muslim community and to the core of beliefs, values, practices and institutions that are integral to Muslim life in the U. S.

SOC 2620 - VIOLENCE IN THE COMMUNITY
This course examines the causes, patterns, and functions of violence. Violence is studied as an extension of biology. A course in the sociobiology of violence in human communities.

SOC 2990 - SOCIOLOGY OF RACE AND LAW
This course provides an overview of the relationship among race, racism and the law throughout the history of the United States. Students will learn about the social construction of race, racism within the US legal and immigration systems and the impact of racial discrimination on US society in areas including access to education, health care, housing, patterns of migration, and equal treatment in the criminal justice system. Attempts to overcome racial inequality, such as the Civil Rights Movement, subsequent racial justice such as the American Indian Movement and the Chicano Movement and the Affirmative Action Programs will also be discussed. The course will conclude with a discussion of the current racial hierarchy and the impact of the racial ideology of colorblindness on racial inequality.

SOC 3430 - ETHNIC AND RACIAL CONFLICT RESOLUTION
Beginning with a general introduction to the multidisciplinary aspects of conflict, this course proceeds to a study of hate groups on the World Wide Web and then to various international conflicts. The essence of the course is extensive use of the Internet to gain information and to communicate with other students taking the course simultaneously throughout the world. Role playing, analytic reports, and a cooperative final project are required.

SOC 3730 - SOCIOLOGY OF SOCIAL MOVEMENTS
This is a survey course on collective behavior, the sociological specialty devoted to the study of innovative, unstructured social phenomena such as crowd behavior; collective violence; individual, group, and organizational behavior in disasters; collective preoccupations; and social movements. The course is divided into two general areas of focus: (1) an overview of sociological theories that have been developed to explain collective behavior; and (2) lectures, discussions, and case studies on different forms of collective behavior.

SOC 3740 - SOCIOLOGY OF WAR
Examines the theories surrounding the causes, nature, and effects of modern warfare and its influence on shaping social structure and personality.

WGS 2020 - LATINOS AND LATINAS IN THE US (see LAS 2020)

WGS 2250 - RACE, GENDER AND SOCIAL JUSTICE
This course analyzes multiple forms of social oppression and inequality based on race (and color), sex (and gender), sexual orientation (and identity), and class in the United States. It will examine systemic aspects of social oppression in different periods and contexts and the ways that systems of social oppression manifest themselves on individual, cultural, institutional and/or global levels thus becoming self-perpetuating but not wholly unaltered structures. Individual and group agency, strategies of resistance, and visions for change will also be studied.

WGS 2500 - RACISM AND SEXISM GLOBAL PERSPECTIVES
This course examines present and historical forms of racism and sexism and other systems of oppression around the globe. The course will investigate global manifestations of racial privilege and changing configurations of whiteness with particular emphasis on the legacy of colonialism. It will also examine the diverse forms of patriarchy as well as its endurance. The connections between other forms of oppression, especially classism and heterosexism, will be explored.

WGS 2720 - POLITICS AND SEX (see POL 2720)

WGS 3070 - SEX EQUITY IN EDUCATION
Develops awareness of sex/gender biases in our culture with particular emphasis on the role of the school. Sex-role socialization patterns and sexual harassment are closely examined as they impact the lives of students. The course also addresses race, class, and sexuality inequities as education issues. Explores methods of eliminating such biases in classroom instruction.

WGS 3100 - CONTEMPORARY FEMINIST ISSUES
Using recent scholarship and pedagogy in gender studies, this course discusses new issues in feminism with an emphasis on diversity, including race, class, culture, ethnicity, sexual orientation, age, and degree of physical ability. It reexamines ways of knowing, and discusses the impact of gender studies on traditional disciplines.

WGS 3140 - REPRODUCTIVE RIGHTS (see PBHL 3140)

WGS 3500 - LESBIAN ISSUES
This course assumes that sexuality is embedded in social structures and interconnected with various forms of structural injustice. Keeping in focus that lesbian women are a very diverse people, the course reviews historical trends, considers issues of definition, and studies relationships, family, and community, including a unit on lesbianism and religion.

WGS 3680 - WOMEN AND WAR (see ASN 3680)

WGS 3730 - POLITICS OF SEXUAL VIOLENCE (see POL 3730)