Department of Physics

Kevin Martus

Bbpict

Office:   Science East Rm 4063
Phone:   973-720-3464
Email:martusk@wpunj.edu
Office Hours:   M, T, W, & Th from 11:00 to 12:15 at the Science Enrichment Center (SCE 3023). Other hour by appointment only.

Department: Physics
Position: Professor and Chair
Area Specialization: Atomic, Molecular and Plasma Physics

Education: Ph.D. Lehigh University

Professional Affiliations:

American Physical Society Division of Atomic, Molecular and Optical Physics
Division of Physics Teachers
American Association of Physics Teachers
American Chemical Society
Sigma Xi
Council on Undergraduate Research - Institutional Liaison
New Jersey Academy of Science

Employment Experience:

William Paterson University of New Jersey, Wayne, NJ
Professor (2005-present)
Associate Professor (2000-2005)
Assistant Professor (1993-2000)
Academic duties include instructing College Physics I & II, General Physics I, II, & III, General Astronomy, Acoustics and Sound, Electronics, Freshman Seminar and development of curriculum. Research interests include the analysis of electron impact dissociation of molecules and plasma discharges. Collaborated with researchers at Stevens Institute of Technology investigating electron impact interactions with Si-Organic compounds and developing, testing and analyzing the optical emissions from plasma discharge sources. Designed, constructed and tested a device to produce atomic hydrogen from ammonia and methane for use in fuel cells. Designed, constructed and characterized a novel light source that produced an intense monochromatic at a wavelength of 121nm. Designed and characterized the dissemination characteristics of a device used to insert genetic material into living cells. Mentored students in research projects including a graduate student from Stevens Institute of Technology, five undergraduate students at WPUNJ and three high school juniors in summer projects.

Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA 1990 to 1993.
Postdoctoral Research Experimental work involving electron and atomic impact phenomena entailing design, construction and testing of a flight instrument that analyzes the velocity and mass of neutrals and ions in low earth orbit. Designed a time-of-flight apparatus to measure the velocity of low energy ion using a novel three gate flight tube. Investigated surface interactions and surface catalyzed reactions involving 5eV ground state atomic oxygen. Experienced with electrostatic, magnetic and quadrupole mass analyzers. Performed extensive calculations with an electron trajectory program that incorporates space charge effects.