Bridge Answer 4

Bridge Problem 4: Answer

 

North
spade7632
heartKQ32
diamondJ54
club53

 

West
spadeJ10985
heart104
diamondA9
club9874

 

East
spadeKQ
heartJ987
diamondQ862
clubKJ6

 

South
spadeA4
heartA65
diamondK1073
clubAQ102

 

Dealer: East
Vul: North-South
E S W N
1NT¹ DBL 2spade DBL
P 2NT P 3NT
P P    
¹ Weak, 12-14 HCP
Opening lead: spadeJ

On the bidding, West has five spades; from the opening lead East can be placed with the doubleton KQ, so the suit is blocked if South takes the first trick with the ace. West's entry -- the ace of diamonds -- must be knocked out before the spades can be unblocked, therefore at trick two South must lead the diamondK. If West ducks, South continues diamonds. Declarer now cannnot be prevented from scoring three hearts, a spade, two diamonds, and three clubs. Declarer can lead clubs from dummy twice, using hearts as entries; East will have to lead diamonds at the end after taking the diamondQ. For example, the play might go: spadeA, diamondK taken by the A, spade to the Q, heart to the K, finesse the club10, heart to the Q, finesse the club Q, clubA, heartA, low diamond to the J; East can take the fourth heart but must lead diamonds at the finish. (If East cashes the diamondQ at trick four, declarer has the two needed diamond tricks, plus two heart entries to finesse in clubs.)

If declarer wastes an entry to dummy at trick two to lead diamonds, there won't be enough entries to get five minor suit winners. For example, West can take the diamond10 with the A, play a spade to East, who can exit with a heart. Say declarer wins in dummy, finesses clubs, cashes the heartA, and plays a low diamond to the J. East wins the diamondQ, cashes the fourth heart, and exits in clubs. Declarer can take two more clubs, but must lost a diamond at the end.