Courses and Programs


What’s Special About Critical Languages and Why Study One?

Any language for which more trained speakers are needed than are available may be considered critical. The list of “critical languages” changes over time as global economic situations and political relationships change and develop. In the United States, first of all, critical languages are widely different from English in grammatical structures, sound systems and writing systems. Secondly, the countries where these languages are spoken are enormously different from the U. S. While language is the single most important tool for solving cross-culture communicating problems, people in the U.S. need to accumulate knowledge and have better understanding of the people in those countries through studying their languages.

These languages are so Less Commonly Taught in the United States, which makes whoever had been trained with these language skills outstanding and precious on the job market. People probably tell you these languages are hard to learn, and your peers probably aren't interested in the challenge. However, learning these languages is not much harder than learning any new knowledge, in term of preparing yourself for a higher rewarding job. If you’re thinking about studying a new language but haven’t decided which one, factors to consider include where the language is spoken, how important the economic and political relationship between the U. S. and the country, and how many jobs are out there determine professionals with knowledge of the language.

We’re offering 7 out of 13 languages which are currently listed as critical languages in the United States. These languages are definitely can be learned, and our faculties are actually specialized in teaching them.

Critical Languages are languages for which there is a high societal demand and insufficient linguistic expertise in the U.S. In 2008, and with generous support from a congressionally-funded grant, William Paterson University was able to establish its own Center for the Study of Critical Languages to foster and promote interest in:

Arabic

ARAB 110 Basic Arabic I*
An introduction to basic standard classical modern Arabic as used all over the Arab world in books, mass media, official records, and documents, etc. The course pays special attention to pronunciation, calligraphy, sentence structure, and vocabulary. It aims at developing the students ability
to hear, comprehend, read, write, and speak Arabic. Basic grammar is introduced all along the course.

ARAB 111 Basic Arabic II*
A study of standard classical Arabic used commonly all over the world. Allows for interpretation and in-depth understanding of Arabic prose and poetry. Prerequisite: ARAB 110 or equivalency

Chinese

CHIN 110 Basic Chinese I*
Provides students a basic understanding of Chinese pronunciation, grammar, and knowledge of some Chinese characters and basic vocabulary. Emphasis is on aural comprehension and elementary speaking of standard Chinese.

CHIN 111 Basic Chinese II*
A continuation of Basic Chinese I. Equal attention given to speaking, reading, and writing. Writing consists of exercises in calligraphy and translation of simple sentences. Students are taught how to use a Chinese-English dictionary. Prerequisite: CHIN 110 or equivalency

CHIN 210 Intermediate Chinese I*
Following continued training in fluent and accurate speech, students learn new vocabulary, and more complicated sentences. Stress is on the understanding of sentence patterns, which serve as a foundation for further study. Prerequisite: CHIN 111 or equivalent.

CHIN 302 Popular Chinese Culture
Examines the Chinese culture made and consumed by ordinary Chinese people, and analyzes how some of the critical Chinese ideological, political, social, and cultural factors are shaped in popular culture. Deals with popular belief systems, popular religions and religious activities, domestic and communal rituals and customs, various forms of popular performance, folk literature, and material culture. Also considers contemporary Chinese popular culture including arts, film, television, and music. These subjects will be studied through both written and visual documentation. Taught in English. (Cross-Listed with ASN306)

CHIN 310 Chinese Advanced Tutorial I
Intended for students developing knowledge of Chinese beyond intermediate level. It focuses on improving the learners Chinese language skills to Advanced-Low level specified in the ACTFL (The American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages) Proficiency Guidelines. Within this framework, instruction aims at integrating Listening comprehension, speaking, reading comprehension, and writing skills in order to help learners communicate meaningfully, effectively, and creatively in the Chinese language.

CHIN 311 Chinese Advanced Tutorial II
Continuation of CHIN 311 for students developing knowledge of Chinese beyond intermediate level. It focuses on improving the learners Chinese language skills to Advanced-Low level specified in the ACTFL (The American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages) Proficiency Guidelines. Within this framework, instruction aims at integrating Listening comprehension, speaking, reading comprehension, and writing skills in order to help learners communicate meaningfully, effectively, and creatively in the Chinese language.

Hindi

HNDI 110 Basic Hindi I*
The first semester of a basic course in the Hindi language. Introduces students to the fundamentals of reading, writing, speaking, and understanding the third most spoken language in the world.

HNDI 210 Intermediate Hindi I
An intermediate course that presumes novice-high proficiency in Hindi, focusing on all four areas of language skillsspeaking, listening, reading, and writing. Reinforces competence development of grammar and vocabulary. Training to read literary and journalistic selections in Hindi, and to write short, grammatically and stylistically-correct Hindi compositions. Oral/aural practice through class discussions, presentations, and laboratory assignments. Enhancement of appreciation of the Hindi/Urdu-speaking world through cultural readings and films. Prerequisite: HNDI 111 or equivalency

HNDI 307 Modern Indian Literature and Film in Translation
An introduction to a selection of writings and cinema translated from various Indian languages into English.The course covers pre-independence texts as well as narratives of Partition and the voices of women. Students will examine contemporary texts and films to gain a broader understanding of how tradition and modernity are embedded in South Asian literature. (Cross-listed with ASN 307)

Japanese

JPAN 110 Basic Japanese I*
Begins with an introduction to the Japanese sound system and to the romanization used in the textbook. Students are taught simple Japanese sentences with vocabulary introduced in a natural context and introduced to the hiragana and katakana syllabaries. Equal attention is given to listening, speaking, reading, and writing.

JPAN 111 Basic Japanese II*
A more in-depth study of the Japanese sound system and the romanization used in the textbook. Students are taught more challenging vocabulary and sentence structure. The hiragana and katakana syllabaries are studied as well. Equal attention is given to speaking, reading, writing, and comprehension. Prerequisite: JPAN 110 or equivalency

JPAN 210 Intermediate Japanese I*
The course, designed as a continuation of Basic Japanese I and II, further increases the students knowledge of Japanese grammar, vocabulary, idioms, and characters, building on the previously acquired foundation in Japanese. Prerequisite: JPAN 111 or equivalent

JPAN 211 Intermediate Japanese II*
A continuation of Intermediate Japanese I. Further increases a students knowledge of Japanese grammar, vocabulary, idioms, and characters, building on the previously acquired foundation in Japanese. Prerequisite: JPAN 210 or equivalent

JPAN 221 Japanese Conversation
The course develops students speaking and aural comprehension abilities in Japanese. It deals with various aspects of spoken Japanese and integrates them into multi-purpose, oral communication skills. Main activities lead towards the development of speaking and listening skills sufficient to handle daily conversation. Other activities include the consideration of pronunciation and intonation, discussion, speech, interpretative reading, story telling, and dictation. These activities, involving a variety of topics regarding Japan, aim as well to deepen students understanding of Japanese culture and behavior. Prerequisite: JPAN 211 or equivalent.

JPAN 302 Contemporary Japanese Culture
This course examines contemporary Japanese culture and society. Drawing upon a contemporary cultural studies approach, it covers a variety of topics, such as Japanese family and social organizations, religion, basic cultural values, attitudes, and perceptions. Like many countries, Japan has been changing drastically in the past few decades. The course, therefore, invites students to look at the Japan of today from the basis of a general, traditional understanding of the country. (Cross-listed: JPAN 301)

JPAN 311 Japanese Advanced Tutorial II
This course is a continuation of JPAN 310 and is intended for students who are interested in developing knowledge of Japanese at an advanced level. It focuses on improving the learners Japanese language skills based on the ACTFL (The American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages) Proficiency GuidelinesAdvanced-Mid. Within this framework, instruction aims at integrating listening comprehension, speaking, reading comprehension, and writing skills in order to help the learners communicate meaningfully, effectively, and creatively in the Japanese language. Prerequisite: JPAN 310 or equivalent.

JPAN 325 Women in Modern Japanese Literature
The portrayal of women, gender and sexuality in contemporary Japanese literature. The course examines modern Japanese society and culture and the interplay between tradition and modernity through the prism of canonical and contemporary literature. Topics include notions of the self, national and gender identity, and the impact of Westernization, modernization, urbanization, industrialization, and globalization. In English. (Cross-listed: ASN 325, WS 326, ENG 358)

Korean

KORE 110 Basic Korean I*
Designed for students with no previous knowledge of Korean. Introduction to Korean, including elements of grammar and vocabulary in a natural context. Equal attention is given to listening comprehension, oral skills, reading, and writing.

Persian

PER 110 Basic Persian I*
Course presents the fundamentals of the modern Persian language and introduces the alphabet, orthography, present tense formations, past and future tenses, and pronominalization. It offers practice in reading, writing, listening and speaking at a graded level of difficulty. Course will present an introduction to Persian culture.

Russian

RUS 111 Basic Russian II*
Continues the communicative approach to the basic elements of the Russian language. Course further develops elementary proficiency in reading, writing, oral comprehension and speaking. Places special emphasis on situational communication as well as upon thorough development

Turkish


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