Graduate Courses

Spring 2015

HIST 5990-60 THE CULTURE OF THE GREAT DEPRESSION

MacLeod, Tuesday, 6-8:40pm

In this course we will examine the cultural history of the United States in the 1930s. We will study the film, music, art, literature, photography, and theater of the period, as well as the culture industries (Hollywood, radio, publishing, etc.) and the role of the government. We will also use the material to explore the question of how scholars study culture, investigating the methodologies of cultural history and cultural studies. We will make extensive use of the extraordinary amount of historical resources and artifacts from this period available online, including folk music, radio shows, photographs, films, magazines, comic books, and so on. We will also explore the presentation of these media, evaluating the educational and archival websites and their methods of exhibition.

 

HIST 5380-60 SEMINAR: EMPIRES

Dai, Wednesday, 6-8:40pm

This seminar examines empires in historical perspective. After initial discussion of core readings, the content of each seminar focuses upon one or more empires within the instructor's expertise. This semester we will explore the interaction, rivalry and mutual-dependency between the Chinese empire and its nomadic neighbors during the long imperial period (ca. 200 B.C.E-1800 C.E.). The main issues include trade, war, diplomacy and hegemony.  Students will encounter various historical theories of empire, focusing on the interaction between agriculture-based Chinese empire and its nomadic competitors. They will gain in-depth understanding of the dynamics of the birth, growth and collapse of empires in the context of the relationships between the two cultures.

 

HIST 5900-60 NEW JERSEY URBAN HISTORY

Gonzalez, Thursday, 6-8:40pm

This course examines city life in New Jersey, the most urban state in the nation. It offers readings about urban New Jersey and urbanization in general, but it primarily focuses on research on the urbanization of a particular city, town, community, or neighborhood in the state. It includes a chronological survey of New Jersey cities from the colonial era to the present and analyzes the historical forces that affect the location, spatial form, political economy, and social geography of cities and their surrounding suburbs. The course looks at how and why cities in the state evolved; the economy of the region; the neighborhood change process; the role of mass transit and the automobile; the suburbanization process; social and residential mobility; the effect of government programs for highways, urban renewal, and housing; the current status of cities; and their historiography.

 

SUMMER 2015

HIST 5500 – HISTORY OF VIOLENCE IN AMERICA

Prof. MacLeod – ONLINE – July 1 - August 6

The course examines the causes, consequences, and uses of violence in American society. It studies the manifestation of violence in a variety of settings. Students learn how violence has played an integral role in the development of American history, and they read case studies in violent episodes in American history and critically assess historical interpretations of violence.

 

FALL 2015

HIST 5000 – HISTORICAL THINKING

Prof. McMahon – Tuesday

What do historians do and how do historians think? This course forms the foundation for graduate studies in history at William Paterson University, introducing students to the essentials of historical scholarship from research to publication. Students will read a variety of sources in order to understand the methodologies of interpretation that historians use, exploring classic and modern theories of historical scholarship and historiographical debate. Students will learn how to find, analyze, and use historical evidence, how to integrate evidence and interpretation in scholarly research papers, and how to analyze and contribute to historiographical debates.

 

HIST 5110 – PAST, PLACE AND PRESERVATION

Prof. Archimedes – Thursday

Virtually every day, buildings are built, modified or torn down somewhere in your community, changing the appearance, value and feeling of where you live. As historians and citizens, how can we integrate changes while preserving the sense of place that we inherited, to pass on to future generations? Historic preservation is a practice that engages this process of community change, often riding along the sharp edge of private property rights versus public interest. The key role of history, culture and the voices of multiple stakeholders come together to create a unique, dynamic synergy of contemporary and local significance in figuring what and how to preserve - and for whom. This course will introduce the theory, structure and practice of historic preservation, through textbook and in-field examples of how this complex system of national public policy effectively meets with local identity in shaping the future of change in our communities.

 

HIST 6830 – MILITARY HISTORY

Prof. Cook – Wednesday

A systematic introduction to the study of military history, this course explores battle experience, military technology, logistics, and tactical and strategic thinking. These subjects are integrated with historical and theoretical approaches to war, and the comparative and cross-cultural study of warfare.

 

HIST 6980 – ADVANCED WRITING WORKSHOP

Prof. MacLeod – Tuesday

Reserved for students who have completed 21 credits of the program. Prior to admission to the seminar, students must submit an approved thesis proposal. During the semester, students conduct research, and write the outline and early draft of their thesis. They are expected to contribute work to the seminar for collective discussion and criticism.

 

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