Yingcong Dai

Professor

Email: daiy@wpunj.edu

Office: Atrium 204
Phone: 973-720-2816
Area Specialization: Chinese history; empire-building and the military institutions of the Qing dynasty

Biography

Yingcong Dai received her doctorate in history from the University of Washington. She has authored two books, The Sichuan Frontier and Tibet: Imperial Strategy in the Early Qing, and The White Lotus War in Late Imperial China. She has also published articles on empire-building and the military institutions of the Qing dynasty. Currently she works on a monograph on the military elites in late imperial China. She is on the editorial boards of the Journal of Chinese Military History and Brill’s book series, “Rulers & Elites: Comparative Studies in Governance.”

Selected Publications

The White Lotus War in Late Imperial China, Seattle: University of Washington Press, forthcoming.

The Sichuan Frontier and Tibet: Imperial Strategy in the Early Qing, Seattle: University of Washington Press, 2009 (hardback and paperback); E-book, 2011.

“Broken Passage to the Summit: Nayancheng’s Botched Mission in the White Lotus War,” in Jeroen Duindam and Sabine Dabringhaus, editors, The Dynastic Centre and the Provinces: Agents and Interactions, Brill, 2014: 49-73.

“Civilians Go into Battle: Hired Militias in the White Lotus War, 1796-1805,” Asia Major (Taipei: Academia Sinica), Third Series, Volume 22, Part II (December 2009): 145-178.

“Military Finance in the High Qing Period: An Overview,” in Nicola Di Cosmo, editor, Military Culture in Imperial China, Harvard University Press, 2009: 296-316 and 380-382.

“Yingyun Shengxi: Military Entrepreneurship in the High Qing Period: 1700-1800,” Late Imperial China (Johns Hopkins University Press), Volume 26:2 (December, 2005): 1-67.

“A Disguised Defeat: The Myanmar Campaign of the Qing Dynasty,” Modern Asian Studies (Cambridge University Press), Volume 38, Part 1 (2004): 145-188.

“The Qing State, Merchants and the Military Labor Force in the Jinchuan Campaigns,”
Later Imperial China (Johns Hopkins University Press), Volume 22:2 (December, 2001): 35-90.

“To Nourish A Strong Military: Kangxi’s Preferential Treatment of His Military Officials,” War and Society (Australian Defense Force Academy), Volume 18:2 (October, 2000): 71-91.

Courses Taught

East Asian Civilization
Traditional China
Modern China
Korean History
Women and Revolution in China
Empires
War and Revolution