Sculpture on Campus - Kipp

Tobias Collection | Artists' Books | Sculpture on Campus | Hobart Manor

Lyman Kipp’s post and lintel assemblages are directly descended from the pioneering sculptures of American David Smith and consist of solid steel and aluminum plates painted in bright primary reds, blues, and yellows.
Stephen Antonakos | Lillian Ball | Tom Bills
Rosemarie Castoro | Nancy Cohen | Bill Finneran | Tova Beck-Friedman |
Michel Gerard | Bradsford Graves | Maria A. Hall | Marion Held |
Albert E. Henselmann | Lyman Kipp | Elaine Lorenz | Eliot Miller | Sally Minker | Richard Nonas | Merril Wagner

Lyman Kipp’s post and lintel assemblages are directly descended from the pioneering sculptures of American David Smith and consist of solid steel and aluminum plates painted in bright primary reds, blues, and yellows. His use of simple geometric forms and emphasis on materials displays a minimalist aesthetic.

Kipp, whose artistic development paralleled the opening years of minimalism was born in Dobbs Ferry, New York and attended Pratt Institute and the Cranbrook Academy of Art. After showing his work at the Betty Parson’s Gallery in New York City beginning in 1954, and in group exhibitions at the Baltimore Museum, the Whitney Museum and the Art Institute of Chicago, Kipp participated in the important 1966 “Primary Structures” exhibition at the Jewish Museum in New York City , which defined the concept of minimalism in the United States. Kipp, however, never fit neatly into a minimalist mode in that he never employed serial units or adhered to a strict geometry. Kipp’s sculpture encourages reference outside itself. With “Yoakum Jack” for example, we are invited to move through the twelve-foot-high construction interacting as we might with architecture. His work also touches on emotionally evocative elements evidenced in the use of color and in the frequent use of a diagonal thrust.

---Nancy Einreinhofer