Chemistry

View the PDF here

(referring to a glass of water) "I mixed this myself. Two parts H. One part O. I don't trust anybody!"            
~ Stephen Wright, comedian

What is chemistry?

Chemistry is the study of composition, structure and properties of substances. Chemists use their knowledge to solve problems involving health, security, and general well-being. Without the applied principles of chemistry, many advances in medicine, consumer products, environmental protection, and military defense would not exist. In everyday life, one uses simple chemistry concepts in cooking, mixing paint colors for an art project, making candles and soap, and dying t-shirts.

The 64-65 credit Bachelor of Science in Chemistry program at William Paterson University is housed in the College of Science and Health. The major includes 32 credits of core coursework, 14-15 advanced course credits, and 16 credits of directed electives. Core courses include Organic Chemistry, Inorganic Chemistry, and Introduction to Instrumental Methods.

To learn more about the degree requirements, please visit this link:
http://www.wpunj.edu/cos/chem-physics/chemistr.html

Admissions information on Chemistry is located here:
http://www.wpunj.edu/admissions/undergraduate/academic-programs/programs_detail.dot?id=124237

 

Interests and Skills

  • Mathematical ability
  • Curiosity
  • Ability to organize and classify information.
  • Analytical and quantitative skills
  • Being able to work both in a team and independently
  • Technical skills
  • Ability to understand chemical concepts
  • Oral and written communication skills

 

Work Environment

People working within the field of chemistry have a number of options in terms of work environment. Chemistry professionals may choose to work in education as researchers, teachers, or professors, government agencies, manufacturing firms, inspection agencies, research laboratories, environmental protection organizations, biotechnology firms, food processors, technical publishing firms, law firms, museums, and plants/animal breeders and growers. Some positions may require further education beyond a bachelor's degre

 

Possible Job Titles

Agricultural Scientist
Assayer
Biochemist
Brewer Lab Assistant
Chemical Oceanographer
College Professor
Color Development Chemist
Crime Lab Analyst
System Analyst
Wastewater Treatment Chemist Anesthesiologist
Cytotechnologist
Environmental Health Specialist
Fire Protection Engineer
Food Scientist Technician
Forensic Chemist
Genetic Counselor
High School Teacher
Hospital Administrator
Hydrologist
Industrial Hygienist
Molecular Biologist
Radiologist
Tissue Technologist
Vector Control Assistant
Water Purification Chemist
Lawyer
Museum Curator
Patent Agent
Dentist 

Hydrogeologist
Occupational Safety Specialist
Perfumer
Pharmaceutical Sales Representative
Physician
Planner
Plastics Engineer
Product Tester
Quality Assurance Manager
Risk Manager
Science Lab Technician
Soil Scientist
Toxicologist
Veterinarian
Yeast Culture Developer
Clinical Specialist
Entomologist
FDA Inspector
Industrial Buyer
Metallurgist
Occupational Health Specialist
Pharmacist
Specification Writer
Cooperative Extension Agent
Environmental Engineer
General Surgery Resident
Optometrist
Scientific Photographer
EPA Inspector
Technical Writer


WPU Alumni

Chemist (Polymers) Sun Chemical Corporation

Chemical Technician Schering Plough Research, Institute

Clinical Research Coordinator St. Michael's Hospital

Research Associate (DNA Analysis) DNX Transgenic Sciences

Lab Technician Unilever

Lab Assistant (Biomedical Implants) Collagen Matrix

Research Technician University of Arizona Cancer Center

 

Enhance Your Qualifications

Successful students tend to seek out opportunities to enhance their qualifications through a variety of means. Within chemistry, some suggestions may include getting involved in laboratory research, developing proficiency with high-tech equipment and computer programs, getting involved in research initiatives outside class, conducting an independent study for credit, joining or becoming a leader in career-related campus organizations; joining a professional chemistry association; learning computer skills; reading scientific journals; gaining practical experience through an internship/practicum/job shadowing; looking into the possibility of graduate school or teacher certification; and attending networking functions.

 

Related Web Sites

Chemistry Jobs www.chemjobs.net

....more jobs www.chemistryjobs.com

Current Chemistry News www.chemweek.com

American Chemical Society www.chemistry.org

American Association for Clinical Chemistry www.aacc.org

Occupational Outlook www.bls.gov/oco/

Occupation Information http://online.onetcenter.org

Industry Information www.vault.com

Job Search and Salary information www.rileyguide.com

 

Other Sources of Information

Please drop by the Career Development and Advisement Center to learn more about careers in chemistry. The career library carries career-specific books and counselors are available to answer any further questions you may have. Visiting the Chemistry and Physics Department on campus may also prove valuable in addressing questions.